Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Hag

Hag

(hăg)
,
Noun.
[OE.
hagge
,
hegge
, witch, hag, AS.
hægtesse
; akin to OHG.
hagazussa
, G.
hexe
, D.
heks
, Dan.
hex
, Sw.
häxa
. The first part of the word is prob. the same as E.
haw
,
hedge
, and the orig. meaning was perh., wood woman, wild woman. √12.]
1.
A witch, sorceress, or enchantress; also, a wizard.
[Obs.]
“[Silenus] that old hag.”
Golding.
2.
An ugly old woman.
Dryden.
3.
A fury; a she-monster.
Crashaw.
4.
(Zool.)
An eel-like marine marsipobranch (
Myxine glutinosa
), allied to the lamprey. It has a suctorial mouth, with labial appendages, and a single pair of gill openings. It is the type of the order
Hyperotreta
. Called also
hagfish
,
borer
,
slime eel
,
sucker
, and
sleepmarken
.
5.
(Zool.)
The hagdon or shearwater.
6.
An appearance of light and fire on a horse’s mane or a man's hair.
Blount.
Hag moth
(Zool.)
,
a moth (
Phobetron pithecium
), the larva of which has curious side appendages, and feeds on fruit trees.
Hag's tooth
(Naut.)
,
an ugly irregularity in the pattern of matting or pointing.

Hag

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Hagged
(hăgd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Hagging
.]
To harass; to weary with vexation.
How are superstitious men
hagged
out of their wits with the fancy of omens.
L'Estrange.

Hag

,
Noun.
[Scot.
hag
to cut; cf. E.
hack
.]
1.
A small wood, or part of a wood or copse, which is marked off or inclosed for felling, or which has been felled.
This said, he led me over hoults and
hags
;
Through thorns and bushes scant my legs I drew.
Fairfax.
2.
A quagmire; mossy ground where peat or turf has been cut.
Dugdale.

Webster 1828 Edition


Hag

HAG

, n.
1.
An ugly old woman; as an old hag of threescore.
2.
A witch; a sorceress; an enchantress.
3.
A fury; a she-monster.
4.
A cartilaginous fish, the Gastrobranchus, which enters other fishes and devours them. It is about five or six inches long, and resembles a small eel. It is allied to the lamprey.
5.
Appearances of light and fire on horses' manes or men's hair, were formerly called hags.

HAG

,
Verb.
T.
To harass; to torment.
1.
To tire; to weary with vexation.

Definition 2022


Hag

Hag

See also: hag, håg, hág, and Hag.

German

Noun

Hag m (genitive Hags or Hages, plural Hage)

  1. (archaic or regional) hedge; haw; enclosure
  2. (archaic or regional) grove; woods; small forest

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms


Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xâːɡ/

Proper noun

Hȃg m (Cyrillic spelling Ха̑г)

  1. The Hague

Declension

Derived terms

hag

hag

See also: håg, hág, Hag, and Hag.

English

Noun

hag (plural hags)

  1. A witch, sorceress, or enchantress; a wizard.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Golding
      [Silenus] that old hag.
  2. (pejorative) An ugly old woman.
  3. A fury; a she-monster.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Crashaw to this entry?)
  4. A hagfish; an eel-like marine marsipobranch, Myxine glutinosa, allied to the lamprey, with a suctorial mouth, labial appendages, and a single pair of gill openings.
  5. A hagdon or shearwater.
  6. An appearance of light and fire on a horse's mane or a man's hair.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Blount to this entry?)
  7. The fruit of the hagberry, Prunus padus.
Synonyms
  • (witch or sorceress):
  • (ugly old woman): See also Wikisaurus:ugly person
  • (fury or she-monster):
  • (eel-like marine marsipobranch): borer, hagfish, sleepmarken, slime eel, sucker
  • (hagdon or shearwater):
  • (appearance of light and fire on mane or hair):
  • (fruit of the hagberry):
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Scots hag (to cut), from Old Norse hǫgg ‘cut, gap, breach’, derivative of hǫggva ‘to hack, hew’; compare English hew.

Noun

hag (plural hags)

  1. A small wood, or part of a wood or copse, which is marked off or enclosed for felling, or which has been felled.
    • Fairfax
      This said, he led me over hoults and hags; / Through thorns and bushes scant my legs I drew.
  2. A quagmire; mossy ground where peat or turf has been cut.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dugdale to this entry?)

Etymology 3

From Proto-Germanic *hag(g)ōnan (compare obsolete Dutch hagen ‘to torment, agonize’, Norwegian haga ‘to tire, weaken’).[3]

Verb

hag (third-person singular simple present hags, present participle hagging, simple past and past participle hagged)

  1. (transitive) To harass; to weary with vexation.
    • L'Estrange
      How are superstitious men hagged out of their wits with the fancy of omens.

References

  1. Vladimir Orel, A Handbook of Germanic Etymology, s.v. “*xaʒaz” (Leiden: Brill, 2003), 149-50.
  2. E. C. Polomé, “Althochdeutsch hag(a)zussa ‘Hexe’: Versuch einer neuen Etymologie”, in: R. Bergmann, ed., Althochdeutsch 2 (Wörter und Namen. Forschungsgeschichte) (1987), 1107-12.
  3. Guus Kroonen, Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic, s.v. “*hagla-” (Leiden: Brill, 2013), 199.

Anagrams


Breton

Conjunction

hag

  1. and

Synonyms

  • (before consonants or /j/) ha

Cornish

Conjunction

hag

  1. and

Synonyms

  • (before consonants) ha

Danish

Verb

hag

  1. imperative of hage