Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Echo

Ech′o

(ĕk′ō̍)
,
Noun.
;
pl.
Echoes
(ĕk′ōz)
.
[L.
echo
, Gr.
ἠχώ
echo, sound, akin to
ἠχή
,
ἦχος
, sound, noise; cf. Skr.
vāç
to sound, bellow; perh. akin to E.
voice
: cf. F.
écho
.]
1.
A sound reflected from an opposing surface and repeated to the ear of a listener; repercussion of sound; repetition of a sound.
The babbling
echo
mocks the hounds.
Shakespeare
The woods shall answer, and the
echo
ring.
Pope.
2.
Fig.: Sympathetic recognition; response; answer.
Fame is the
echo
of actions, resounding them.
Fuller.
Many kind, and sincere speeches found an
echo
in his heart.
R. L. Stevenson.
3.
(a)
(Myth. & Poetic)
A wood or mountain nymph, regarded as repeating, and causing the reverberation of them.
(b)
(Gr. Myth.)
A nymph, the daughter of Air and Earth, who, for love of Narcissus, pined away until nothing was left of her but her voice.
Compelled me to awake the courteous
Echo

To give me answer from her mossy couch.
Milton.
Echo organ
(Mus.)
,
a set organ pipes inclosed in a box so as to produce a soft, distant effect; – generally superseded by the swell.
Echo stop
(Mus.)
,
a stop upon a harpsichord contrived for producing the soft effect of distant sound.
To applaud to the echo
,
to give loud and continuous applause.
M. Arnold.
I would
applaud
thee
to the very echo
,
That should applaud again.
Shakespeare

Ech′o

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Echoed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Echoing
. –
3d pers. sing. pres.
Echoes
.]
1.
To send back (a sound); to repeat in sound; to reverberate.
Those peals are
echoed
by the Trojan throng.
Dryden.
The wondrous sound
Is
echoed
on forever.
Keble.
2.
To repeat with assent; to respond; to adopt.
They would have
echoed
the praises of the men whom they envied, and then have sent to the newspaper anonymous libels upon them.
Macaulay.

Ech′o

,
Verb.
I.
To give an echo; to resound; to be sounded back;
as, the hall
echoed
with acclamations
.
Echoing noise.”
Blackmore.

Webster 1828 Edition


Echo

ECH'O

,
Noun.
[L. echo; Gr.sound, to sound.]
1.
A sound reflected or reverberated from a solid body; sound returned; repercussion of sound; as an echo from a distant hill.
The sound must seem an echo to the sense.
2.
In fabulous history, a nymph, the daughter of the Air and Tellus, who pined into a sound, for love of Narcissus.
3.
In architecture, a vault or arch for redoubling sounds.

ECH'O

,
Verb.
I.
To resound; to reflect sound.
The hall echoed with acclamations.
1.
To be sounded back; as echoing noise.

ECH'O

,
Verb.
T.
To reverberate or send back sound; to return what has been uttered.
Those peals are echoed by the Trojan throng.

Definition 2022


Echo

Echo

See also: echo, écho, echó, ekhó, and echö

Translingual

Etymology 1

Proper noun

Echo f

  1. A taxonomic genus within the family Calopterygidae – certain damselflies.
Hypernyms
Hyponyms

External links

Etymology 2

Symbol

Echo

  1. The letter E in the ICAO spelling alphabet.

English

Echo by Alexandre Cabanel (1874)

Proper noun

Echo

  1. (Greek mythology) An oread, punished by Hera by losing her own voice and only being able to mimic that of others.
  2. (astronomy) Short for 60 Echo, a main belt asteroid.

Translations


German

Etymology

From Latin echo, from Ancient Greek ἠχώ (ēkhṓ).

Pronunciation

Noun

Echo n (genitive Echos, plural Echos)

  1. reflected sound, echo
    • Homo simplex et rectus. Oder, der alte redliche Teutsche Michel. Das ist: Sittliche, aus Göttlicher Heil. Schrifft, mit anmuthigen Historien, schönen Gleichnussen, nutzlichen Moralien, und Sprüchen der H.H. Vättern verfaßte Fest- und Feyertägliche Predigen. [...] Erster Theil. Collected by P. Mauritius Natthenhusa, Augsburg (Augspurg), 1718, p.187:
      „Dieser hohe Cederbaum hat sich auf disen Streich also tieff gebogen und gedemüthiget, daß er aus seinem zerknirschten Hertzen einen lieblichen Echonem oder Widerhall gegeben, Domine, quid me vis facere.“
    • Iconismus. Das ist: Lob- und Ehren-Predigen, Von den Lieben Heiligen GOTTES, und Ordens-Stifftern [...] By Franciscus Caccia, Wien (Wienn in Oesterreich), 1710, p.366:
      „Endlich dann zum Beschluß ist jedermäniglich bekant, daß welcher von dem andern weit entlegen, daß er nicht gehört werde, es sey denn, daß er starck ruffe, und schreye, und dadurch wird ein Echo gehöret. Mein Xaveri! allermassen Du weit von uns entlegen, müssen wir dir auch lauth zuruffen, und wir werden auch einen Echonem hören.“
    • Der nach Venedig überbrachte Mohr, Oder: Curiose und warhaffte Erzehlung und Beschreibung aller Curiositäten und Denckwürdigkeiten, Welche dem Wohl-Erwürdigen P. Dionysio Carli von Placenz, Capuciner-Ordens Prediger, und berühmten Missionario Apostolico, In seiner etlich-jährigen Mission In allen Vier Welt-Theilen, Africa, America, Asia, und Europa, unter tausendfältigen Leib- und Lebens-Gefahren, in Bekehrung der unglaubigen und barbarischen in specie AEthipischen Völcker aufgestossen; Worbey zugleich dieser letzteren Barbairsche Sitten und unmenschliche Grausamkeiten, Nicht weniger die dem Authori in allen vier Welt-Theilen vorgekommene Länder, Königreiche, Inseln, Provintzen und Städte, mit ihren Situationen und Seltzamkeiten, verwunderns-würdig beschrieben, und der curiosen Welt mitgetheilet werden. Erstlich von dem Authore in Welscher Sprach beschrieben, Anjetzo aber dem Geist- und Weltl. Teutschen Leser zu einem nutzlichen Zeit-Vertreib in die Hoch-Teutsche Sprache übersetzet. Augsburg (Augspurg), 1692, p.329:
      Deßgleichen sahen wir auch den Orth, allwo der Sicialianische Tyrann Dionysius einen künstlichen Echonem in einer Höhle hat machen lassen, durch welchen er seiner darinnen eingesperrten Sklaven Gespräch von aussen, ohne daß sie ihn gesehen, hat hören können, welcher Echo mir weit besser, als der zu Granada gefallen hat.

Synonyms

  • Widerhall

Declension

Old Declension

This word was once declined like a Latin third declension noun of the form Echo with genitive Echonis.

Proper noun

Echo f (genitive Echo or Echos)

  1. the nymphe Echo

echo

echo

See also: Echo, écho, echó, ekhó, and echö

English

Alternative forms

  • echoe (obsolete)
  • eccho (obsolete)

Noun

echo (plural echoes or echos)

  1. A reflected sound that is heard again by its initial observer.
    • Shakespeare
      The babbling echo mocks the hounds.
    • Alexander Pope
      The woods shall answer, and the echo ring.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, “chapter X”, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855:
      “Then what is your little trouble?” “My little trouble!” I felt that this sort of thing must be stopped at its source. It was only ten minutes to dressing-for-dinner time, and we could go on along these lines for hours. “Listen, old crumpet,” I said patiently. “Make up your mind whether you are my old friend Reginald Herring or an echo in the Swiss mountains. If you're simply going to repeat every word I say –”
    • 2013 May-June, William E. Conner, An Acoustic Arms Race”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 206-7:
      Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close (less than half a meter) above vegetation and effectively blending into the clutter of echoes that the bat receives from the leaves and stems around them.
  2. An utterance repeating what has just been said.
  3. (figuratively) Sympathetic recognition; response; answer.
    • Fuller
      Fame is the echo of actions, resounding them.
    • Robert Louis Stevenson
      Many kind, and sincere speeches found an echo in his heart.
  4. (computing) The displaying on the command line of the command that has just been executed.
  5. The letter E in the ICAO spelling alphabet.
  6. (whist, bridge) A signal, played in the same manner as a trump signal, made by a player who holds four or more trumps (or, as played by some, exactly three trumps) and whose partner has led trumps or signalled for trumps.
  7. (whist, bridge) A signal showing the number held of a plain suit when a high card in that suit is led by one's partner.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

echo (third-person singular simple present echoes, present participle echoing, simple past and past participle echoed)

  1. (of a sound or sound waves, intransitive) To reflect off of a surface and return.
  2. (by extension, transitive) To repeat back precisely what another has just said: to copy in the imitation of a natural echo.
    • John Dryden
      Those peals are echoed by the Trojan throng.
    • Keble
      The wondrous sound / Is echoed on forever.
  3. (by extension, transitive) To repeat (another's speech, opinion, etc.).
    • 2013 July-August, Sarah Glaz, Ode to Prime Numbers”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:
      Some poems, echoing the purpose of early poetic treatises on scientific principles, attempt to elucidate the mathematical concepts that underlie prime numbers. Others play with primes’ cultural associations. Still others derive their structure from mathematical patterns involving primes.
    Sid echoed his father's point of view.

Synonyms

  • See also Wikisaurus:imitate

Translations

Anagrams


Asturian

Verb

echo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of echar

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛxo/

Noun

echo n

  1. echo (reflected sound)

Synonyms


Dutch

Pronunciation

Etymology

From Middle English ecco, ekko, from Medieval Latin ecco, from Latin echo, from Ancient Greek ἠχώ (ēkhṓ), from ἠχή (ēkhḗ, sound).

Noun

echo m (plural echo's, diminutive echootje n)

  1. echo

Verb

echo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of echoën
  2. imperative of echoën

Ladino

Noun

echo m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling איג׳ו)

  1. work

Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἠχώ (ēkhṓ).

Noun

ēchō f (genitive ēchūs); fourth declension

  1. echo

Declension

Fourth declension, dative plural in -ibus.

Number Singular Plural
nominative ēcho ēchūs
genitive ēchūs ēchuum
dative ēchuī ēchibus
accusative ēchum ēchūs
ablative ēchū ēchibus
vocative ēcho ēchūs

Other forms:

  • Accusative singular -ōn (ēchōn).

References


Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛxɔ/

Noun

echo n

  1. echo

Declension


Portuguese

Noun

echo m (plural echos)

  1. Obsolete spelling of eco (used in Portugal until September 1911 and died out in Brazil during the 1920s).

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈe̞.t͡ʃo̞/
  • Homophone: hecho
  • Rhymes: -etʃo

Verb

echo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of echar.