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Webster 1913 Edition


Ally

Al-ly′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Allied
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Allying
.]
[OE.
alien
, OF.
alier
, F.
alier
, fr. L.
alligare
to bind to;
ad
+
ligare
to bind. Cf.
Alligate
,
Alloy
,
Allay
,
Ligament
.]
1.
To unite, or form a connection between, as between families by marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league, or confederacy; – often followed by to or with.
O chief! in blood, and now in arms
allied
.
Pope.
2.
To connect or form a relation between by similitude, resemblance, friendship, or love.
These three did love each other dearly well,
And with so firm affection were
allied
.
Spenser.
The virtue nearest to our vice
allied
.
Pope.
Ally is generally used in the passive form or reflexively.

Al-ly′

,
Noun.
;
pl.
Allies
.
[See
Ally
,
Verb.
]
1.
A relative; a kinsman.
[Obs.]
Shak.
2.
One united to another by treaty or league; – usually applied to sovereigns or states; a confederate.
The English soldiers and their French
allies
.
Macaulay.
3.
Anything associated with another as a helper; an auxiliary.
Science, instead of being the enemy of religion, becomes its
ally
.
Buckle.
4.
Anything akin to another by structure, etc.

Al′ly

,
Noun.
See
Alley
, a marble or taw.

Webster 1828 Edition


Ally

ALLY'

,
Verb.
T.
[L. ligo.]
1.
To unite, or form a relation, as between families by marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league or confederacy.
2.
To form a relation by similitude, resemblance or friendship. Note. This word is more generally used in the passive form, as families are allied by blood; or reciprocally, as princes ally themselves to powerful states.

Definition 2022


Ally

Ally

See also: ally and -ally

English

Proper noun

Ally

  1. A diminutive of the female given names Alison, Alice and Alexandra.
  2. A diminutive of the male given name Alfred or of other names beginning with Al-.

Quotations

  • 1880 Alfred Tennyson: To Alfred Tennyson, My Grandson:
    Golden-hair'd Ally whose name is one with mine,
    Crazy with laughter and babble and earth's new wine

Anagrams

ally

ally

See also: Ally and -ally

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: əlī', IPA(key): /əˈlaɪ/ (verb)
  • enPR: ăl'ī, IPA(key): /ˈæl.aɪ/ (noun)
  • Rhymes: -aɪ

Verb

ally (third-person singular simple present allies, present participle allying, simple past and past participle allied)

  1. (transitive) To unite, or form a connection between, as between families by marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league, or confederacy
    • (Can we date this quote?) Alexander Pope:
      O chief! in blood, and now in arms allied.
  2. (transitive) To connect or form a relation between by similitude, resemblance, friendship, or love.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Edmund Spenser:
      These three did love each other dearly well, And with so firm affection were allied.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Alexander Pope:
      The virtue nearest to our vice allied.
Usage notes
  • Generally used in the passive form or reflexively.
  • Often followed by to or with.
Synonyms
Translations

Noun

ally (plural allies)

  1. One united to another by treaty or league; usually applied to sovereigns or states; a confederate.
  2. Anything associated with another as a helper; an auxiliary.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Buckle:
      Science, instead of being the enemy of religion, becomes its ally.
  3. Anything akin to something else by structure, etc.
  4. (taxonomy) A closely related species, usually within the same family.
    • Gruiformes — cranes and allies
  5. (obsolete) A relative; a kinsman.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
Translations
Related terms

Etymology 2

Diminutive of alabaster.

Noun

ally (plural allies)

  1. Alternative form of alley (a glass marble or taw)

References

  • ally in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Anagrams