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Webster 1913 Edition


Unison

U′ni-son

(?; 277)
,
Noun.
[LL.
unisonus
having the same sound; L.
unus
one +
sonus
a sound: cf. F.
unisson
, It.
unisono
. See
One
, and
Sound
a noise.]
1.
Harmony; agreement; concord; union.
2.
(Mus.)
Identity in pitch; coincidence of sounds proceeding from an equality in the number of vibrations made in a given time by two or more sonorous bodies. Parts played or sung in octaves are also said to be in unison, or in octaves.
☞ If two cords of the same substance have equal length, thickness, and tension, they are said to be in unison, and their sounds will be in unison. Sounds of very different qualities and force may be in unison, as the sound of a bell may be in unison with a sound of a flute. Unison, then, consists in identity of pitch alone, irrespective of quality of sound, or timbre, whether of instruments or of human voices. A piece or passage is said to be sung or played in unison when all the voices or instruments perform the same part, in which sense unison is contradistinguished from harmony.
3.
A single, unvaried.
[R.]
Pope.
In unison
,
in agreement; agreeing in tone; in concord.

U′ni-son

(?; 277)
,
Adj.
[Cf. It.
unisono
. See
Unison
,
Noun.
]
1.
Sounding alone.
[Obs.]
[sounds] intermixed with voice,
Choral or
unison
.
Milton.
2.
(Mus.)
Sounded alike in pitch; unisonant; unisonous;
as,
unison
passages, in which two or more parts unite in coincident sound
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Unison

U'NISON

,
Noun.
[L. unus, one, and sonur, sound.]
1.
In music, an accordance or coincidence of sounds, proceeding from an equality in the number of vibrations made in a given time by a sonorous body. If two chords of the same matter have equal length, thickness and tension, they are said to be in unison, and their sounds will be in unison. Sounds of very different qualities and force may be in unison; as the sound of a bell may be in unison with a sound of a flute. Unison then consists in sameness of degree, or similarity in respect to gravity or acuteness, and is applicable to any sound, whether of instruments or of the human organs, &c.
2.
A single unvaried note.
In unison, in agreement; in harmony.

U'NISON

,
Adj.
Sounding alone.
Sounds intermix'd with voice, choral or unison.

Definition 2022


unison

unison

See also: UNISON

English

Noun

unison (usually uncountable, plural unisons)

  1. The state of being together, in harmony, at the same time, as one, synchronized.
    Everyone moved in unison, but the sudden change in weight distribution capsized the boat.
  2. (music) The simultaneous playing of an identical note more than once.
    • 2007 July 16, James R. Oestreich, “With Levine as Tour Guide, a Journey Through Mahler’s Third Symphony”, in New York Times:
      The young principal timpanist, Timothy Genis, was superb throughout, though his sidekick timpanist sometimes lagged in the final unisons.
    The unison has a pitch ratio of 1:1.

Abbreviations

  • (in music): P1

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams


Swedish

20.000 sjöngo unisont (1937), the sing-along at Skansen

Adjective

unison (not comparable)

  1. in unison (of song)
    unison sång
    sing-along

Declension

Inflection of unison
Indefinite/attributive Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular unison
Neuter singular unisont
Plural unisona
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 unisone
All unisona
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in an attributive role.