Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Troop

Troop

,
Noun.
[F.
troupe
, OF.
trope
,
trupe
, LL.
troppus
; of uncertain origin; cf. Icel.
þorp
a hamlet, village, G.
dorf
a village, dial. G.
dorf
a meeting. Norw.
torp
a little farm, a crowd, E.
thorp
. Cf.
Troupe
.]
1.
A collection of people; a company; a number; a multitude.
That which should accompany old age –
As honor, love, obedience,
troops
of friends –
I must not look to have.
Shakespeare
2.
Soldiers, collectively; an army; – now generally used in the plural.
Farewell the plumed
troop
, and the big wars.
Shakespeare
His
troops
moved to victory with the precision of machines.
Macaulay.
3.
(Mil.)
Specifically, a small body of cavalry, light horse, or dragoons, consisting usually of about sixty men, commanded by a captain; the unit of formation of cavalry, corresponding to the company in infantry. Formerly, also, a company of horse artillery; a battery.
4.
A company of stageplayers; a troupe.
W. Coxe.
5.
(Mil.)
A particular roll of the drum; a quick march.

Troop

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Trooped
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Trooping
.]
1.
To move in numbers; to come or gather in crowds or troops.
“Armies . . . troop to their standard.”
Milton.
2.
To march on; to go forward in haste.
Nor do I, as an enemy to peace,
Troop
in the throngs of military men.
Shakespeare

Webster 1828 Edition


Troop

TROOP

, n.
1.
A collection of people; a company; a number; a multitude. Gen.49. 2 Sam.23. Hos.7.
That which should accompany old age,
As honor, love, obedience, troops of friends,
I must not look to have.
2.
A body of soldiers. But applied to infantry, it is now used in the plural, troops, and this word signifies soldiers in general, whether more or less numerous, including infantry, cavalry and artillery. We apply the word to a company, a regiment or an army. The captain ordered his troops to halt; the colonel commanded his troops to wheel and take a position on the flank; the general ordered his troops to attack; the troops of France amounted to 400,000 men.
3.
Troop, in the singular, a small body or company of cavalry, light horse or dragoons, commanded by a captain.
4.
A company of stage-players.

TROOP

,
Verb.
I.
To collect in numbers.
Armies at the call of trumpet,
Troop to their standard.
1.
To march in a body.
I do not, as an enemy to peace,
Troop in the throngs of military men.
2.
To march in haste or in company.

Definition 2022


troop

troop

English

Noun

troop (plural troops)

  1. (collective) A collection of people; a company; a number; a multitude.
    • Shakespeare
      That which should accompany old age / As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends / I must not look to have.
  2. (military) A small unit of cavalry or armour commanded by a captain, corresponding to a platoon or company of infantry.
  3. A detachment of soldiers or police, especially horse artillery, armour, or state troopers.
  4. Soldiers, military forces (usually "troops").
    • Shakespeare
      Farewell the plumed troop, and the big wars.
    • Macaulay
      His troops moved to victory with the precision of machines.
  5. (nonstandard) A company of stageplayers; a troupe.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of W. Coxe to this entry?)
  6. (Scouting) A basic unit of girl or boy scouts, consisting of 6 to 10 youngsters.
  7. (collective) A group of baboons.
  8. A particular roll of the drum; a quick march.
  9. (mycology) Mushrooms that are in a close group but not close enough to be called a cluster.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

troop (third-person singular simple present troops, present participle trooping, simple past and past participle trooped)

  1. To move in numbers; to come or gather in crowds or troops.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Then everybody once more knelt, and soon the blessing was pronounced. The choir and the clergy trooped out slowly, [], down the nave to the western door. [] At a seemingly immense distance the surpliced group stopped to say the last prayer.
  2. To march on; to go forward in haste.
  3. To move or march as if in a crowd.
    The children trooped into the room.

Derived terms

  • troop the colour (British, military)

Translations

References

  • “troop” in the Canadian Oxford Dictionary, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, 2004.
  • troop” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

See also

  • Appendix:English collective nouns

Anagrams


Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

troop f (plural tropen, diminutive troopje n)

  1. (music, literature, linguistics) trope