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Webster 1913 Edition


Thick

Thick

(thĭk)
,
Adj.
[
Com
par.
Thicker
(-ẽr)
;
sup
erl.
Thickest
.]
[OE.
thicke
, AS.
þicce
; akin to D.
dik
, OS.
thikki
, OHG.
dicchi
thick, dense, G.
dick
thick, Icel.
þykkr
,
þjökkr
, and probably to Gael. & Ir.
tiugh
. Cf.
Tight
.]
1.
Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; – said of a solid body;
as, a timber seven inches
thick
.
Were it as
thick
as is a branched oak.
Chaucer.
My little finger shall be
thicker
than my father’s loins.
1 Kings xii. 10.
2.
Having more depth or extent from one surface to its opposite than usual; not thin or slender;
as, a
thick
plank;
thick
cloth;
thick
paper;
thick
neck
.
3.
Dense; not thin; inspissated;
as,
thick
vapors
. Also used figuratively;
as,
thick
darkness
.
Make the gruel
thick
and slab.
Shakespeare
4.
Not transparent or clear; hence, turbid, muddy, or misty;
as, the water of a river is apt to be
thick
after a rain
.
“In a thick, misty day.”
Sir W. Scott.
5.
Abundant, close, or crowded in space; closely set; following in quick succession; frequently recurring.
The people were gathered
thick
together.
Luke xi. 29.
Black was the forest;
thick
with beech it stood.
Dryden.
6.
Not having due distinction of syllables, or good articulation; indistinct;
as, a
thick
utterance
.
7.
Deep; profound;
as,
thick
sleep
.
[R.]
Shak.
8.
Dull; not quick;
as,
thick
of fearing
.
Shak.
His dimensions to any
thick
sight were invincible.
Shakespeare
9.
Intimate; very friendly; familiar.
[Colloq.]
We have been
thick
ever since.
T. Hughes.
Thick
is often used in the formation of compounds, most of which are self-explaining; as,
thick
-barred,
thick
-bodied,
thick
-coming,
thick
-cut,
thick
-flying,
thick
-growing,
thick
-leaved,
thick
-lipped,
thick
-necked,
thick
-planted,
thick
-ribbed,
thick
-shelled,
thick
-woven, and the like.
Thick register
.
(Phon.)
See the Note under
Register
,
Noun.
, 7.
Thick stuff
(Naut.)
,
all plank that is more than four inches thick and less than twelve.
J. Knowles.
Syn. – Dense; close; compact; solid; gross; coarse.

Thick

,
Noun.
1.
The thickest part, or the time when anything is thickest.
In the
thick
of the dust and smoke.
Knolles.
2.
A thicket;
as, gloomy
thicks
.
[Obs.]
Drayton.
Through the
thick
they heard one rudely rush.
Spenser.
He through a little window cast his sight
Through
thick
of bars, that gave a scanty light.
Dryden.
Thick-and-thin block
(Naut.)
,
a fiddle block. See under
Fiddle
.
Through thick and thin
,
through all obstacles and difficulties, both great and small.
Through thick and thin
she followed him.
Hudibras.
He became the panegyrist,
through thick and thin
, of a military frenzy.
Coleridge.

Thick

(thĭk)
,
adv.
[AS.
þicce
.]
1.
Frequently; fast; quick.
2.
Closely;
as, a plat of ground
thick
sown
.
3.
To a great depth, or to a greater depth than usual;
as, land covered
thick
with manure
.
Thick and threefold
,
in quick succession, or in great numbers.
[Obs.]
L'Estrange.

Thick

,
Verb.
T.
&
I.
[Cf. AS.
þiccian
.]
To thicken.
[R.]
The nightmare Life-in-death was she,
Who
thicks
man's blood with cold.
Coleridge.

Webster 1828 Edition


Thick

THICK

, a.
1.
Dense; not thin; as thick vapors; a thick fog.
2.
Inspissated; as, the paint is too thick.
3.
Turbid; muddy; feculent; not clear; as, the water of a river is thick after a rain.
4.
Noting the diameter of a body; as a piece of timber seven inches thick.
My little finger shall be thicker than my father's loins. 1 Kings 12.
5.
Having more depth or extent from one surface to its opposite than usual; as a thick plank; thick cloth; thick paper.
6.
Close; crowded with trees or other objects; as a thick forest or wood; thick grass; thick corn.
The people were gathered thick together.
7.
Frequent; following each other in quick succession. The shot flew thick as hail.
Favors came thick upon him.
Not thicker billows beat the Libyan main.
8.
Set with things close to each other; not easily pervious.
Black was the forest, thick with beech it stood.
9.
Not having due distinction of syllables or good articulation; as a thick utterance.
He speaks too thick.
10. Dull; somewhat deaf; as thick of hearing.

THICK

,
Noun.
The thickest part, or the time when anything is thickest.
In the thick of the dust and smoke he presently entered his men.
1.
A thicket. [Not in use.]
Thick and thin, whatever is in the way.
Through thick and thin she follow'd him.

THICK

,
adv.
Frequently; fast.
I hear the trampling of thick beating feet.
1.
Closely; as a plat of ground thick sown.
2.
To a great depth, or to a thicker depth than usual; as a bed covered thick with tan; land covered thick with manure.and threefold, in quick succession, or in great numbers. [Not in use.]

THICK

,
Verb.
I.
To become thick or dense. [Not used.]

Definition 2021


thick

thick

English

Alternative forms

  • (slang: curvy): thicc

Adjective

thick (comparative thicker, superlative thickest)

  1. Relatively great in extent from one surface to the opposite in its smallest solid dimension.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 17, in The China Governess:
      The face which emerged was not reassuring. It was blunt and grey, the nose springing thick and flat from high on the frontal bone of the forehead, whilst his eyes were narrow slits of dark in a tight bandage of tissue. […].
  2. Measuring a certain number of units in this dimension.
    I want some planks that are two inches thick.
  3. Heavy in build; thickset.
    • 2007, James T. Knight, Queen of the Hustle
      As she twirled around in front of the mirror admiring how the dress showed off her thick booty, she felt like a princess in a children's storybook.
    • 2009, Kenny Attaway, Nuthouse Love (page 82)
      JJ loved “average hood girls”, Cody loved dark-skinned thick girls and Mooch lusted for yellow-boned skinny woman.
    He had such a thick neck that he had to turn his body to look to the side.
  4. Densely crowded or packed.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 3, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      My hopes wa'n't disappointed. I never saw clams thicker than they was along them inshore flats. I filled my dreener in no time, and then it come to me that 'twouldn't be a bad idee to get a lot more, take 'em with me to Wellmouth, and peddle 'em out. Clams was fairly scarce over that side of the bay and ought to fetch a fair price.
    We walked through thick undergrowth.
  5. Having a viscous consistency.
    My mum’s gravy was thick but at least it moved about.
  6. Abounding in number.
    The room was thick with reporters.
  7. Impenetrable to sight.
    We drove through thick fog.
  8. Difficult to understand, or poorly articulated.
    We had difficulty understanding him with his thick accent.
  9. (informal) Stupid.
    He was as thick as two short planks.
  10. (informal) Friendly or intimate.
    They were as thick as thieves.
    • T. Hughes
      We have been thick ever since.
  11. Deep, intense, or profound.
    Thick darkness.
    • Shakespeare
      thick sleep
  12. (Britain, dated) troublesome; unreasonable
    • 1969 Anita Leslie, Lady Randolph Churchill, New York, Charles Scribner's Sons, page 288:
      "Of course I was eager to put her affairs in order," George told my father, "but I found it a bit thick when expected to pay for Lord Randolph Churchill's barouche purchased in the '80s."
  13. (slang, of women) Curvy and voluptuous, and especially having large hips.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Adverb

thick (comparative thicker, superlative thickest)

  1. In a thick manner.
    Snow lay thick on the ground.
  2. Thickly.
    Bread should be sliced thick to make toast.
  3. Frequently; in great numbers.
    The arrows flew thick and fast around us.

Translations

Noun

thick (uncountable)

  1. The thickest, or most active or intense, part of something.
    It was mayhem in the thick of battle.
    • Dryden
      He through a little window cast his sight / Through thick of bars, that gave a scanty light.
  2. A thicket.
    • Drayton
      gloomy thicks
    • Spenser
      Through the thick they heard one rudely rush.
  3. (slang) A stupid person; a fool.
    • 2014, Joseph O'Connor, The Thrill of It All (page 100)
      If there was doctorates in bollocksology and scratching yourself in bed, the two of you'd be professors by now. Pair of loafing, idle thicks.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

thick (third-person singular simple present thicks, present participle thicking, simple past and past participle thicked)

  1. (archaic, transitive) To thicken.
    The nightmare Life-in-death was she, / Who thicks man's blood with cold. Coleridge.