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Webster 1913 Edition


Stray

Stray

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Strayed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Straying
.]
[OF.
estraier
,
estraer
, to stray, or as adj., stray, fr. (assumed) L.
stratarius
roving the streets, fr. L.
strata
(sc.
via
) a paved road. See
Street
, and
Stray
,
Adj.
]
1.
To wander, as from a direct course; to deviate, or go out of the way.
Thames among the wanton valleys
strays
.
Denham.
2.
To wander from company, or from the proper limits; to rove at large; to roam; to go astray.
Now, until the break of day,
Through this house each fairy
stray
.
Shakespeare
A sheep doth very often
stray
.
Shakespeare
3.
Figuratively, to wander from the path of duty or rectitude; to err.
We have erred and
strayed
from thy ways.
[GREEK][GREEK][GREEK] of Com. Prayer.
While meaner things, whom instinct leads,
Are rarely known to
stray
.
Cowper.
Syn. – To deviate; err; swerve; rove; roam; wander.

Stray

,
Verb.
T.
To cause to stray.
[Obs.]
Shak.

Stray

,
Adj.
[Cf. OF.
estraié
, p. p. of
estraier
. See
Stray
,
Verb.
I.
, and cf.
Astray
,
Estray
.]
Having gone astray; strayed; wandering;
as, a
stray
horse or sheep
.
Stray line
(Naut.)
,
that portion of the log line which is veered from the reel to allow the chip to get clear of the stern eddies before the glass is turned.
Stray mark
(Naut.)
,
the mark indicating the end of the stray line.

Stray

,
Noun.
1.
Any domestic animal that has an inclosure, or its proper place and company, and wanders at large, or is lost; an estray. Used also figuratively.
Seeing him wander about, I took him up for a
stray
.
Dryden.
2.
The act of wandering or going astray.
[R.]
Shak.

Webster 1828 Edition


Stray

STRAY

,
Verb.
I.
[The elements of this word are not certainly known. L., G., to wander, to strike; both probably from the root of reach, stretch. See Straggle.]
1.
To wander, as from a direct course; to deviate or go out of the way. We say, to stray from the path or road into the forest or wood.
2.
To wander from company, or from the proper limits; as, a sheep strays from the flock; a horse strays from an inclosure.
3.
To rove; to wander from the path of duty or rectitude; to err; to deviate.
We have erred and strayed--
4.
To wander; to rove at large; to play free and unconfined.
Lo, the glad gales oer all her beauties stray, breathe on her lips and in her bosom play.
5.
To wander; to run a serpentine course.
Where Thames among the wanton valley strays.

STRAY

,
Verb.
T.
To mislead. [Not in use.]

STRAY

,
Noun.
1.
Any domestic animal that has left an inclosure or its proper place and company, and wanders at large or is lost. The laws provide that strays shall be taken up, impounded and advertised.
Seeing him wander about, I took him up for a stray.
2.
The act of wandering. [Little used.]

Definition 2021


stray

stray

English

A stray dog wanders the streets.

Noun

stray (plural strays)

  1. Any domestic animal that has no enclosure, or its proper place and company, and wanders at large, or is lost; an estray.
  2. (figuratively) One who is lost, either literally or metaphorically.
  3. The act of wandering or going astray.
  4. (historical) An area of common land or place administered for the use of general domestic animals, i.e. "the stray"

Hyponyms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

stray (third-person singular simple present strays, present participle straying, simple past and past participle strayed)

  1. (intransitive) To wander, as from a direct course; to deviate, or go out of the way.
    • Denham
      Thames among the wanton valleys strays.
  2. (intransitive) To wander from company, or from the proper limits; to rove at large; to roam; to go astray.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To wander from the path of duty or rectitude; to err.
  4. (transitive) To cause to stray.

Translations

Synonyms

Adjective

stray (not comparable)

  1. Having gone astray; strayed; wandering; as, a stray horse or sheep.
  2. In the wrong place; misplaced.
    a stray comma

Derived terms

  • stray line
  • stray mark

Translations

References

  1. stray in Online Etymology Dictionary

Anagrams