Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Never

Nev′er

(nĕv′ẽr)
,
adv.
[AS.
nǣfre
;
ne
not, no +
ǣfre
ever.]
1.
Not ever; not at any time; at no time, whether past, present, or future.
Shak.
Death still draws nearer,
never
seeming near.
Pope.
2.
In no degree; not in the least; not.
Whosoever has a friend to guide him, may carry his eyes in another man’s head, and yet see
never
the worse.
South.
And he answered him to
never
a word.
Matt. xxvii. 14.
Never is much used in composition with present participles to form adjectives, as in never-ceasing, never-dying, never-ending, never-fading, never-failing, etc., retaining its usual signification.
Never a deal
,
not a bit.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.
Never so
,
as never before; more than at any other time, or in any other circumstances; especially; particularly; – now often expressed or replaced by
ever so
.


Ask me
never so
much dower and gift.
Gen. xxxiv. 12.


A fear of battery, . . . though
never so
well grounded, is no duress.
Blackstone.

Webster 1828 Edition


Never

NEVER

, adv.
1.
Not ever; not at any time; at no time. It refers to the past or the future. This man was never at Calcutta; he will never be there.
2.
It has a particular use in the following sentences.
Ask me never so much dower and gift. Genesis 34.
Which will not hearken to the voice of charmers, charming never so wisely. Psalm 58.
A fear of battery-though never so well grounded, is no duress.
This is a genuine English use of never, found in our Saxon authors, and it ought to be retained. Ask me so much dower as never was done; that is, dower to any extent. The practice of using ever in such phrases, is corrupt. It not only destroys the force but the propriety of the phrase.
3.
In no degree; not.
Whoever has a friend to guide him, may carry his eyes in another mans head and yet see never the worse.
4.
It is used for not. He answered him never a word; that is, not ever. This use is not common.
5.
It is much used in composition; as in never-ending, never-failing, never-dying, never-ceasing, never-fading; but in all such compounds, never retains its true meaning.

Definition 2022


never

never

English

Alternative forms

Adverb

never (not comparable)

  1. At no time; on no occasion; in no circumstance.
    • 1634, William Shakespeare, John Fletcher, The Two Noble Kinsmen, Act 2, Scene 4,
      Why should I love this Gentleman? Tis odds / He never will affect me;
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, in The Celebrity:
      In the old days, to my commonplace and unobserving mind, he gave no evidences of genius whatsoever. He never read me any of his manuscripts, [], and therefore my lack of detection of his promise may in some degree be pardoned.
    • 1908, Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables, Chapter XXI: A New Departure in Flavorings,
      "I never thought you were so fond of Mr. Phillips that you'd require two handkerchiefs to dry your tears just because he was going away," said Marilla.
    • 1919, B. G. Jefferis, J. L. Nichols, Searchlights on Health: Sensible Rules for the Nurse,
      Never speak of the symptoms of your patient in his presence, unless questioned by the doctor, whose orders you are always to obey implicitly.
    I finally finished, and I never want to do that again.
    I repeated the test a hundred times, and never saw a positive result.
    I will never tell.
  2. Not at any other time; not on any other occasion; not previously.
  3. (colloquial) Negative particle (used to negate verbs in the simple past tense; also used absolutely).
    The police say I stole the car, but I never did it.
    You said you were going to mow the lawn today.I never!

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: first · down · good · #99: never · shall · most · where

Anagrams


Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

never m

  1. indefinite plural of neve

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) naiver
  • (Sursilvan, Surmiran) neiver

Etymology

From neiv or from Vulgar Latin *nivicō, *nivicāre < *nivō, nivāre, from Latin nix, nivis, from Proto-Indo-European *nígʷʰs, *snígʷʰs (snow).

Verb

never

  1. (Sutsilvan) to snow

Related terms