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Webster 1913 Edition


Merry

Mer′ry

,
Adj.
[
Com
par.
Merrier
;
sup
erl.
Merriest
.]
[OE.
merie
,
mirie
,
murie
, merry, pleasant, AS.
merge
,
myrige
, pleasant; cf.
murge
, adv.; prob. akin to OHG.
murg
, short, Goth.
gamaúrgjan
to shorten; cf. L.
murcus
a coward, who cuts off his thumb to escape military service; the Anglo-Saxon and English meanings coming from the idea of making the time seem short. Cf.
Mirth
.]
1.
Laughingly gay; overflowing with good humor and good spirits; jovial; inclined to laughter or play; sportive.
They drank, and were
merry
with him.
Gen. xliii. 34.
I am never
merry
when I hear sweet music.
Shakespeare
2.
Cheerful; joyous; not sad; happy.
Is any
merry
? let him sing psalms.
Jas. v. 13.
3.
Causing laughter, mirth, gladness, or delight;
as, a
merry
jest
.
Merry wind and weather.”
Spenser.
Merry dancers
.
See under
Dancer
.
Merry men
,
followers; retainers.
[Obs.]

His
merie men
commanded he
To make him bothe game and glee.
Chaucer.
To make merry
,
to be jovial; to indulge in hilarity; to feast with mirth.
Judg. ix. 27.
Syn. – Cheerful; blithe; lively; sprightly; vivacious; gleeful; joyous; mirthful; jocund; sportive; hilarious.

Mer′ry

(mĕr′ry̆)
,
Noun.
(Bot.)
A kind of wild red cherry.

Webster 1828 Edition


Merry

MER'RY

, a.
1.
Gay and noisy; jovial; exhilarated to laughter.
Man is the merriest species of the creation.
They drank and were merry with him. Gen.43.
2.
Causing laughter or mirth; as a merry jest.
3.
Brisk; as a merry gale. [This is the primary sense of the word.]
4.
Pleasant; agreeable; delightful.
To make merry, to be jovial; to indulge in hilarity; to feast with mirth. Judges 9.

Definition 2022


Merry

Merry

See also: merry and Merrý

English

Proper noun

Merry

  1. A surname. Originally a nickname for a merry person.
  2. A female given name from the adjective, also a diminutive of Mercy.
    • 1844 Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit, Chapter 2:
      'Is he handsome, Pa?' inquired the younger daughter.
      'Silly Merry!' said the eldest: Merry being fond for Mercy. 'What is the premium, Pa? tell us that.'
    • 1964 Brigid Brophy, The Waste Disposal Unit, Best Short Plays of the World Theatre 1958-1967, page 50:
      It was on account of she had such a happy temperament I persuaded Mr. van der Most to let me call her Merry. Lots of folks, when they first meet her, they think she's called Mary - Maria, as you would say it, Signor Lumaca - but no, her name is really Merry, M-E-double-R-Y, because, I always tell them, she is.
  3. A diminutive of the male given name Meredith.

merry

merry

See also: Merry and Merrý

English

Alternative forms

Adjective

merry (comparative merrier, superlative merriest)

  1. Jolly and full of high spirits.
    We had a very merry Christmas.
    • Shakespeare
      I am never merry when I hear sweet music.
  2. Festive and full of fun and laughter.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      If I have the chance, I will make our worshipful Sheriff pay right well for that which he hath done to me. Maybe I may bring him some time into Sherwood Forest and have him to a right merry feast with us.
    Everyone was merry at the party.
  3. Brisk
    The play moved along at a merry pace.
  4. Causing laughter, mirth, gladness, or delight.
    a merry jest
    • Spenser
      merry wind and weather
  5. (euphemistic) drunk; tipsy
    Some of us got a little merry at the office Christmas party.

Derived terms

Synonyms

Antonyms

Translations

Derived terms