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Webster 1913 Edition


Limp

Limp

(lĭmp)
,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Limped
(lĭmt; 215)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Limping
.]
[Cf. AS.
lemp
healt lame, OHG.
limphen
to limp, be weak; perh. akin to E.
lame
, or to
limp
, a √120.]
To halt; to walk lamely. Also used figuratively.
Shak.

Limp

,
Noun.
A manner of walking in which the movement of one or both legs is noticeably abnormal, usually due to injury or disease; a halt; the act of limping.

Limp

,
Noun.
(Ore Washing)
A scraper for removing poor ore or refuse from the sieve.

Limp

,
Adj.
[Cf. Icel.
limpa
limpness, weakness, and E.
lap
,
Noun.
,
lop
,
Verb.
T.
Cf.
Limber
,
Adj.
]
1.
Flaccid; flabby, as flesh.
Walton.
2.
Lacking stiffness; flimsy;
as, a
limp
cravat
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Limp

LIMP

,
Verb.
I.
To halt; to walk lamely.

LIMP

,
Noun.
A halt; act of limping.

LIMP

,
Adj.
Vapid; weak. [Not used.]

Definition 2022


limp

limp

English

Verb

limp (third-person singular simple present limps, present participle limping, simple past lamp or limped, past participle lump or limped)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To happen; befall; chance.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To come upon; meet.
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle English *limp, *lemp, from Old English *lemp (recorded only in compound lemphealt (limping), from Proto-Germanic *limpaną (to hang down), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lemb-, *(s)lembʰ- (to hang loosely, hang limply). Cognate with German lampecht (flaccid, limp), Icelandic lempinn, lempiligur (pliable, gentle). See above.

Adjective

limp (comparative limper, superlative limpest)

  1. flaccid; flabby, like flesh.
  2. lacking stiffness; flimsy
    a limp rope
  3. (of a ****) not erect
  4. (of a man) not having an erect ****
  5. physically weak
    • 2011, Tom Fordyce, Rugby World Cup 2011: England 12-19 France
      Another line-out was stolen, and when the ball was sent left Clerc stepped and spun through limp challenges from Wilkinson, Chris Ashton and Foden to dive over and make it 11-0.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

limp (third-person singular simple present limps, present participle limping, simple past and past participle limped)

  1. (intransitive) To be inadequate or unsatisfactory.

Noun

limp (plural limps)

  1. A scraper of board or sheet-iron shaped like half the head of a small cask, used for scraping the ore off the sieve in the operation of hand-jigging.

Etymology 3

From Middle English *limpen, from Old English *limpan, *lympan, from Proto-Germanic *limpaną (to hang down), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lemb-, *(s)lembʰ- (to hang loosely, hang limply). Cognate with Low German lumpen (to limp), German dialectal lampen (to hang down loosely), Icelandic limpa (limpness, weakness).

Verb

limp (third-person singular simple present limps, present participle limping, simple past and past participle limped)

  1. (intransitive) To walk lamely, as if favouring one leg.
    • 2011 April 11, Phil McNulty, “Liverpool 3 - 0 Man City”, in BBC Sport:
      Dirk Kuyt sandwiched a goal in between Carroll's double as City endured a night of total misery, with captain Carlos Tevez limping off early on with a hamstring strain that puts a serious question mark over his participation in Saturday's FA Cup semi-final against Manchester United at Wembley.
  2. (intransitive, figuratively, of a vehicle) To travel with a malfunctioning system of propulsion
    The bomber limped home on one engine.
  3. (poker slang, intransitive) To call.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

limp (plural limps)

  1. An irregular, jerky or awkward gait
    She walks with a limp.
  2. A scraper for removing poor ore or refuse from the sieve
  3. A code-word among Jacobites, standing for Louis XIV, James II, Queen Mary of Modena and the Prince of Wales.[1]
Translations

Anagrams

References

  1. Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, Millennium Edition, art. "Limp"

Dalmatian

Alternative forms

  • linp

Etymology

From a derivative of Latin lampas. Compare Italian lampo.

Noun

limp m

  1. lightning