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Webster 1913 Edition


Corner

Cor′ner

(k?r′n?r)
,
Noun.
[OF.
corniere
,
cornier
, LL.
cornerium
,
corneria
, fr. L.
cornu
horn, end, point. See
Horn
.]
1.
The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal.
2.
The space in the angle between converging lines or walls which meet in a point;
as, the chimney
corner
.
3.
An edge or extremity; the part farthest from the center; hence, any quarter or part.
From the four
corners
of the earth they come.
Shakespeare
4.
A secret or secluded place; a remote or out of the way place; a nook.
This thing was not done in a
corner
.
Acts xxvi. 26.
5.
Direction; quarter.
Sits the wind in that
corner
!
Shakespeare
6.
The state of things produced by a combination of persons, who buy up the whole or the available part of any stock or species of property, which compels those who need such stock or property to buy of them at their own price;
as, a
corner
in a railway stock
.
[Broker’s Cant]
Corner stone
,
the stone which lies at the corner of two walls, and unites them; the principal stone; especially, the stone which forms the corner of the foundation of an edifice; hence, that which is fundamental importance or indispensable.
“A prince who regarded uniformity of faith as the corner stone of his government.”
Prescott.
Corner tooth
,
one of the four teeth which come in a horse's mouth at the age of four years and a half, one on each side of the upper and of the lower jaw, between the middle teeth and the tushes.

Cor′ner

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Cornered
(-n?rd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Cornering
.]
1.
To drive into a corner.
2.
To drive into a position of great difficulty or hopeless embarrassment;
as, to
corner
a person in argument
.
3.
To get command of (a stock, commodity, etc.), so as to be able to put one's own price on it;
as, to
corner
the shares of a railroad stock; to
corner
petroleum
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Corner

CORNER

,
Noun.
[See Horn and Grain.]
1.
The point where two converging lines meet; properly, the external point; an angle; as, we meet at the corner of the state-house, or at the corner of two streets.
2.
The interior point where two lines meet; an angle.
3.
The space between two converging lines or walls which meet in a point. Hence,
4.
An inclosed place; a secret or retired place.
This thing was not done in a corner. Acts 26.
5.
Indefinitely any part; a part. They searched every corner of the forest. They explored all corners of the country.
6.
The end, extremity or limit; as the corners of the head or beard. Leviticus 21 and 19.
Corner-teeth of a horse, the foreteeth between the middling teeth and the tushes, two above and two below, on each side of the jaw, which shoot when the horse is four years and a half old.

Definition 2022


corner

corner

See also: córner

English

A corner (junction of streets) in Cork, Ireland, circa 1910

Pronunciation

  • (rhotic) IPA(key): /kɔɹnɚ/
  • (non-rhotic) IPA(key): /kɔːnə(ɹ)/
  • (US, rhotic, r-dissimilation) IPA(key): /kɔːnɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)nə(ɹ)

Noun

corner (plural corners)

  1. The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal.
    The corners of the wire mesh were reinforced with little blobs of solder.
    1. The space in the angle between converging lines or walls which meet in a point.
      The chimney corner was full of cobwebs.
      • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapter1:
        They burned the old gun that used to stand in the dark corner up in the garret, close to the stuffed fox that always grinned so fiercely. Perhaps the reason why he seemed in such a ghastly rage was that he did not come by his death fairly. Otherwise his pelt would not have been so perfect. And why else was he put away up there out of sight?—and so magnificent a brush as he had too.
    2. The projection into space of an angle in a solid object.
      Herbert bruised his shin on the corner of the coffee table.
    3. An intersection of two streets; any of the four outer points off the street at that intersection.
      The liquor store on the corner also sold lottery tickets.
  2. An edge or extremity; the part farthest from the center; hence, any quarter or part, or the direction in which it lies.
    Shining a light in the dark corners of the mind. I took a trip out to his corner of town.
    • c. 1596-1598, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act 2, Scene 7:
      Why, that’s the lady: all the world desires her; / From the four corners of the earth they come, / To kiss this shrine, this mortal-breathing saint:
  3. A secret or secluded place; a remote or out of the way place; a nook.
    On weekends, Emily liked to find a quiet corner and curl up with a good book.
  4. (business, finance) A sufficient interest in a salable security or commodity to allow the cornering party to influence prices.
    In the 1970s, private investors tried to get a corner on the silver market, but were ultimately unsuccessful.
  5. (heading) Relating to the playing field.
    1. (baseball) One of the four vertices of the strike zone.
      The pitch was just off the corner, low and outside.
    2. (baseball) First base or third base.
      There are runners on the corners with just one out.
    3. (soccer) A corner kick.
    4. (American football) A cornerback.
    5. (boxing) The corner of the ring, which is where the boxer rests before and during a fight.
    6. (boxing, by extension) The group of people who assist a boxer during a bout.
  6. A place where people meet for a particular purpose.
    Welcome to our English corner.
Quotations
  • 2006, Kelly K. Chappell, Effects of Concept-based Instruction on Calculus Students’ Acquisition of Conceptual Understanding and Procedural Skill, in John Dossey, Solomon Friedberg, Glenda Lappan, W. James Lewis (editorial committee), Research in Collegiate Mathematics Education VI, page 41,
    Of the students enrolled in a traditional learning environment, 65% (42 of 65) correctly answered that the function was not differentiable (or had no derivative) at .Of those, 55% (23 of 42) argued that a function did not have a derivative at a corner.
Synonyms
Derived terms
See also
Translations

Verb

corner (third-person singular simple present corners, present participle cornering, simple past and past participle cornered)

  1. (transitive) To drive (someone) into a corner or other confined space.
    The cat had cornered a cricket between the sofa and the television stand.
    • 2013 June 18, Simon Romero, "Protests Widen as Brazilians Chide Leaders," New York Times (retrieved 21 June 2013):
      In Juazeiro do Norte, demonstrators cornered the mayor inside a bank for hours and called for his impeachment, while thousands of others protested teachers’ salaries.
  2. (transitive) To trap in a position of great difficulty or hopeless embarrassment.
    The reporter cornered the politician by pointing out the hypocrisy of his position on mandatory sentencing, in light of the politician's own actions in court.
  3. (finance, business, transitive) To get or attempt to get a sufficient command of (a stock, commodity, etc.), so as to be able to manipulate its price.
    The buyers attempted to corner the shares of the railroad stock, so as to facilitate their buyout.
    It's extremely hard to corner the petroleum market because there are so many players.
  4. (automotive, transitive) To turn a corner or drive around a curve.
    As the stock car driver cornered the last turn, he lost control and spun out.
  5. (automotive, intransitive) To handle while moving around a corner in a road or otherwise turning.
    That BMW corners well, but the suspension is too stiff.
Translations

Etymology 2

corn + -er

Noun

corner (plural corners)

  1. Someone or something that corns

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: spring · troops · meeting · #898: corner · spite · built · lower

Catalan

Noun

corner m (plural corners)

  1. snowy mespilus (Amelanchier ovalis)

French

Etymology 1

Borrowing from English corner

Noun

corner m (plural corners)

  1. (soccer) corner kick, corner
Synonyms

Etymology 2

corne + -er

Verb

corner

  1. to fold a corner of a page
  2. to blow, horn (a cornet or horn)
  3. to bellow
  4. to honk, beep (a vehicle's horn)
  5. to shout from the rooftops
Conjugation

Italian

Etymology

Borrowing from English corner.

Noun

corner m (plural corner)

  1. (soccer) corner
  2. (figuratively) difficult situation
  3. (economics) market niche in which a company has a monopoly

Old French

Verb

corner

  1. to blow; to horn (sound a horn)

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-rns, *-rnt are modified to rz, rt. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.