Definify.com

Definition 2023


Castro

Castro

See also: castro, castró, and castrò

English

Proper noun

Castro

  1. A surname.
  2. A gayborhood area of San Francisco

Portuguese

Etymology

From castro (fortification).

The municipality in Paraná was named after Portuguese minister Martinho de Mello e Castro[1].

Pronunciation

Proper noun

Castro m f

  1. A habitational surname.

Proper noun

Castro f

  1. Castro (a city and municipality in Paraná, Brazil)

References

  1. 2006, João Carlos Vicente Ferreira, Municípios paranaenses: origens e significados de seus nomes.

Spanish

Etymology

Probably ultimately from Latin castra (military camp).

Proper noun

Castro m

  1. A surname.

castro

castro

See also: Castro, castró, and castrò

Catalan

Verb

castro

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of castrar

Italian

Verb

castro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of castrare

Anagrams


Latin

Etymology

Denominative in from a lost instrumental noun, Proto-Italic *kastrom (knife), maybe from Proto-Indo-European *ḱes- (to cut up, to slaughter). See also castrum, careō.

Pronunciation

Verb

castrō (present infinitive castrāre, perfect active castrāvī, supine castrātum); first conjugation

  1. I prune
  2. I ampute
  3. I punish
  4. I purge
  5. I castrate or spay
  6. I dock (a tail)

Inflection

   Conjugation of castro (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present castrō castrās castrat castrāmus castrātis castrant
imperfect castrābam castrābās castrābat castrābāmus castrābātis castrābant
future castrābō castrābis castrābit castrābimus castrābitis castrābunt
perfect castrāvī castrāvistī castrāvit castrāvimus castrāvistis castrāvērunt, castrāvēre
pluperfect castrāveram castrāverās castrāverat castrāverāmus castrāverātis castrāverant
future perfect castrāverō castrāveris castrāverit castrāverimus castrāveritis castrāverint
passive present castror castrāris, castrāre castrātur castrāmur castrāminī castrantur
imperfect castrābar castrābāris, castrābāre castrābātur castrābāmur castrābāminī castrābantur
future castrābor castrāberis, castrābere castrābitur castrābimur castrābiminī castrābuntur
perfect castrātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect castrātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect castrātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present castrem castrēs castret castrēmus castrētis castrent
imperfect castrārem castrārēs castrāret castrārēmus castrārētis castrārent
perfect castrāverim castrāverīs castrāverit castrāverīmus castrāverītis castrāverint
pluperfect castrāvissem castrāvissēs castrāvisset castrāvissēmus castrāvissētis castrāvissent
passive present castrer castrēris, castrēre castrētur castrēmur castrēminī castrentur
imperfect castrārer castrārēris, castrārēre castrārētur castrārēmur castrārēminī castrārentur
perfect castrātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect castrātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present castrā castrāte
future castrātō castrātō castrātōte castrantō
passive present castrāre castrāminī
future castrātor castrātor castrantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives castrāre castrāvisse castrātūrus esse castrārī castrātus esse castrātum īrī
participles castrāns castrātūrus castrātus castrandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
castrāre castrandī castrandō castrandum castrātum castrātū

Derived terms

Descendants

References


Portuguese

castro

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈkaʃ.tɾu/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkas.tɾu/, /ˈkaʃ.tɾu/
  • Hyphenation: cas‧tro

Etymology 1

From Old Portuguese castro, from Latin castrum, from Proto-Indo-European *kes- (to cut, cut off, separate).

Cognate with Galician castro, Spanish castro and Romanian castru.

Noun

castro m (plural castros)

  1. fort (of Roman or prehistoric origin)
  2. a fortified pre-Roman Iron Age village frequently found in the northwestern regions of the Iberian Peninsula
Derived terms
Related terms
See also
  • cividade
  • citânia

Etymology 2

Verb

castro

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of castrar

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin castrum.

Noun

castro m (plural castros)

  1. fort, fortified settlement

Verb

castro

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of castrar.