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Webster 1913 Edition


Scud

Scud

(skŭd)
,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Scudded
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Scudding
.]
[Dan.
skyde
to shoot, shove, push, akin to
skud
shot, gunshot, a shoot, young bough, and to E.
shoot
. √159. See
Shoot
.]
1.
To move swiftly; especially, to move as if driven forward by something.
The first nautilus that
scudded
upon the glassy surface of warm primeval oceans.
I. Taylor.
The wind was high; the vast white clouds
scudded
over the blue heaven.
Beaconsfield.
2.
(Naut.)
To be driven swiftly, or to run, before a gale, with little or no sail spread.

Scud

,
Verb.
T.
To pass over quickly.
[R.]
Shenstone.

Scud

,
Noun.
1.
The act of scudding; a driving along; a rushing with precipitation.
2.
Loose, vapory clouds driven swiftly by the wind.
Borne on the
scud
of the sea.
Longfellow.
The
scud
was flying fast above us, throwing a veil over the moon.
Sir S. Baker.
3.
A slight, sudden shower.
[Prov. Eng.]
Wright.
4.
(Zool.)
A small flight of larks, or other birds, less than a flock.
[Prov. Eng.]
5.
(Zool.)
Any swimming amphipod crustacean.
Storm scud
.
See the Note under
Cloud
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Scud

SCUD

,
Verb.
I.
1. In a gereral sense, to be driven or to flee or fly with haste. In seamen's language, to be driven with precipitation before a tempest. This is done with a sail extended on the foremast of the ship, or when the wind is too violent, without any sail set, which is called scudding under bare poles.
2. To run with precipitation; to fly.

SCUD

, n.
1. A low thin cloud, or thin clould driven by the wind.
2. A driving along; a rushing with precipitation.

Definition 2022


Scud

Scud

See also: scud

English

Proper noun

Scud

  1. A Soviet-developed ballistic missile.

French

Etymology

Same as above.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skød/, /skyd/

Proper noun

Scud m

  1. A Scud missile
  2. (colloquial) (figuratively) A reprimand or a verbal attack

scud

scud

See also: Scud

English

Alternative forms

  • skud (dialectal sense only)

Adjective

scud (comparative more scud, superlative most scud)

  1. (slang, Scotland) Naked.

Verb

scud (third-person singular simple present scuds, present participle scudding, simple past and past participle scudded)

  1. (intransitive) To race along swiftly (especially used of clouds).
    • I. Taylor
      the first Nautilus that scudded upon the glassy surface of warm primæval oceans
    • Beaconsfield
      The wind was high; the vast white clouds scudded over the blue heaven.
    • 1920, Peter B. Kyne, The Understanding Heart, Chapter II:
      During the preceding afternoon a heavy North Pacific fog had blown in [] Scudding eastward from the ocean, it had crept up and over the redwood-studded crests of the Coast Range mountains, []
  2. (transitive, intransitive, nautical) To run, or be driven, before a high wind with no sails set.
  3. (Northumbria) To hit.
  4. (Northumbria) To speed.
  5. (Northumbria) To skim.

Translations

References

  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165
  • scud” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001)..

Noun

scud (plural scuds)

  1. The act of scudding.
  2. Clouds or rain driven by the wind.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick:
      But high above the flying scud and dark-rolling clouds, there floated a little isle of sunlight, from which beamed forth an angel's face []
  3. A gust of wind.
  4. (Bristol) A scab on a wound.
  5. A small flight of larks, or other birds, less than a flock.
  6. Any swimming amphipod.
  7. (slang, Scotland) Pornography.
  8. (slang, Scotland) Irn-Bru.
    a bottle of Scud

Synonyms

Translations