Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Pegasus

Peg′a-sus

,
Noun.
[L., fr. Gr.
Πήγασος
.]
1.
(Gr. Myth.)
A winged horse fabled to have sprung from the body of Medusa when she was slain. He is noted for causing, with a blow of his hoof, Hippocrene, the inspiring fountain of the Muses, to spring from Mount Helicon. On this account he is, in modern times, associated with the Muses, and with ideas of poetic inspiration.
Each spurs his jaded
Pegasus
apace.
Byron.
2.
(Astron.)
A northen constellation near the vernal equinoctial point. Its three brightest stars, with the brightest star of Andromeda, form the
square of Pegasus
.
3.
(Zool.)
A genus of small fishes, having large pectoral fins, and the body covered with hard, bony plates. Several species are known from the East Indies and China.

Definition 2022


Pegasus

Pegasus

See also: pegasus and Pégasus

Translingual

Pegasus lancifer

Etymology

Latin Pegasus (mythical white winged stallion of Medusa and Poseidon)

Proper noun

Pegasus m

  1. A taxonomic genus within the family Pegasidae – small fish with pectoral fins and body covered with hard, bony plates, from the East Indies and China.

Hypernyms

Hyponyms


English

Pegasus and Bellerophon, from Mabie, Hamilton Wright (Ed.):Myths Every Child Should Know (1914) (1)

Proper noun

Pegasus

  1. (Greek mythology) A winged horse fabled to have sprung from the blood of Medusa when she was slain. He is noted for causing, with a blow of his hoof, Hippocrene, the inspiring fountain of the Muses, to spring from Mount Helicon. Bellerophon tamed and rode upon Pegasus when he defeated the Chimaera.
  2. (astronomy) An autumn constellation of the northern sky, near the vernal equinoctial point, said to resemble the mythical horse. Its three brightest stars, with the brightest star of Andromeda, form the square of Pegasus. It contains the stars Markab and Algenib.

Translations

Noun

Pegasus (plural Pegasi)

  1. (historical) A coin of ancient Corinth, with a winged horse depicted on the obverse.
    • 2007 February 15, Talbert, R. J. A., Timoleon and the Revival of Greek Sicily: 344-317 B.C., Cambridge University Press, ISBN 9780521034135, OL 7715039M, page 167:
      Confidence in Corinthian Pegasi grew up in the Greek zone of the island in such a way that Pegasi became the accepted coin of the realm.

See also


Dutch

Proper noun

Pegasus m

  1. (Greek mythology) Pegasus
  2. (astronomy) Pegasus

Finnish

Proper noun

Pegasus

  1. (astronomy) The constellation Pegasus.

Declension

Inflection of Pegasus (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
nominative Pegasus
genitive Pegasuksen
partitive Pegasusta
illative Pegasukseen
singular plural
nominative Pegasus
accusative nom. Pegasus
gen. Pegasuksen
genitive Pegasuksen
partitive Pegasusta
inessive Pegasuksessa
elative Pegasuksesta
illative Pegasukseen
adessive Pegasuksella
ablative Pegasukselta
allative Pegasukselle
essive Pegasuksena
translative Pegasukseksi
instructive
abessive Pegasuksetta
comitative

See also

  • Pegasos

pegasus

pegasus

See also: Pegasus and Pégasus

English

Noun

pegasus (plural pegasuses or pegasi)

  1. A winged horse (imaginary or mythical, sometimes figurative).

Translations


Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek Πήγασος (Pḗgasos)

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈpeː.ɡa.sus/, [ˈpeː.ɡa.sʊs]

Noun

pēgasus m (genitive pēgasī); second declension

  1. pegasus (a winged horse or a bird with a horse's head, suspected to live in Africa)
    • c. 43 CE, Pomponius Mela, De situ orbis libri III 3
      Sunt mirae aves cornutae tragopanes et equinis auribus pegasi.
      [In Africa] there are wonderful birds: horned tragopans and pegasi with horse's ears.
    • c. 77 CE – 79 CE, Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia 8.72
      Aethiopia generat [] pinnatos equos et cornibus armatos, quos pegasos vocant.
      • 1855 translation by John Bostock and Henry Thomas Riley
        Æthiopia produces [] horses with wings, and armed with horns, which are called pegasi.
    • c. 77 CE – 79 CE, Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia 10.26
      Pegasos equino capite volucres et grypas aurita aduncitate rostri fabulosos reor, illos in Scythia, hos in Aethiopia.
      • 1855 translation by John Bostock and Henry Thomas Riley
        I look upon the birds as fabulous which are called "pegasi," and are said to have a horse's head; as also the griffons, with long ears and a hooked beak. The former are said to be natives of Scythia, the latter of Æthiopia.
    • c. 250 CE, Solinus, De mirabilibus mundi
      Illius caeli ales est pegasus, sed haec ales equinum nihil praeter aures habet.
      In that climate lives the bird pegasus, but this winged creature has nothing equine except ears.

Inflection

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative pēgasus pēgasī
genitive pēgasī pēgasōrum
dative pēgasō pēgasīs
accusative pēgasum pēgasōs
ablative pēgasō pēgasīs
vocative pēgase pēgasī