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Webster 1913 Edition


Felly

Fel′ly

,
adv.
In a fell or cruel manner; fiercely; barbarously; savagely.
Spenser.

Fel′ly

,
Noun.
;
pl.
Fellies
.
[OE.
feli
,
felwe
,
felow
, AS.
felg
,
felge
; akin to D.
velg
, G.
felge
, OHG.
felga
felly (also, a harrow, but prob. a different word), Dan.
felge
.]
The exterior wooden rim, or a segment of the rim, of a wheel, supported by the spokes.
[Written also
felloe
.]
Break all the spokes and
fellies
from her wheel.
Shakespeare

Webster 1828 Edition


Felly

FEL'LY

,
adv.
[See Fell, cruel.] Cruelly; fiercely; barbarously.

FEL'LY

,
Noun.
The exterior part or rim of a wheel, supported by the spokes.
Felo de se, in law, one who commits felony by suicide, or deliberately destroys his own life.

Definition 2021


felly

felly

English

Alternative forms

  • felloe
  • fellick, felk (dialectal)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛli/
  • Hyphenation: fel‧ly

Noun

felly (plural fellies)

  1. The outer rim of a wheel, supported by the spokes.
    • 1602, Hamlet by William Shakespeare, act 2 scene 2 lines 426-430:
      all you Gods, / In generall Synod take away her power: / Breake all the Spokes and Fallies from her wheele [...].
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      The felly harshed against the curbstone: stopped.

Alternative forms

Etymology 2

From Middle English felly, felli, fellich, equivalent to fell + -ly.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛlli/, /ˈfɛli/

Adverb

felly (comparative more felly, superlative most felly)

  1. (now rare) Fiercely, harshly.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vi:
      Ioues dreaded thunder light / Does scorch not halfe so sore, nor damned ghoste / In flaming Phlegeton does not so felly roste.

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈvɛ.ɬɨ̞]

Adverb

felly

  1. so, thus