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Webster 1913 Edition


Apple

Ap′ple

(ăp′p’l)
,
Noun.
[OE.
appel
,
eppel
, AS.
æppel
,
æpl
; akin to Fries. & D.
appel
, OHG,
aphul
,
aphol
, G.
apfel
, Icel.
epli
, Sw.
äple
, Dan.
æble
, Gael.
ubhall
, W.
afal
, Arm.
aval
, Lith.
obůlys
, Russ.
iabloko
; of unknown origin.]
1.
The fleshy pome or fruit of a rosaceous tree (
Pyrus malus
) cultivated in numberless varieties in the temperate zones.
☞ The European crab apple is supposed to be the original kind, from which all others have sprung.
2.
(bot.)
Any tree genus
Pyrus
which has the stalk sunken into the base of the fruit; an apple tree.
3.
Any fruit or other vegetable production resembling, or supposed to resemble, the apple;
as,
apple
of love, or love
apple
(a tomato), balsam
apple
, egg
apple
, oak
apple
.
4.
Anything round like an apple;
as, an
apple
of gold
.
Apple
is used either adjectively or in combination; as,
apple
paper or
apple
-paper,
apple
-shaped,
apple
blossom,
apple
dumpling,
apple
pudding.
Apple blight
,
an aphid which injures apple trees. See
Blight
,
Noun.
Apple borer
(Zool.)
,
a coleopterous insect (
Saperda candida
or
Saperda bivittata
), the larva of which bores into the trunk of the apple tree and pear tree.
Apple brandy
,
brandy made from apples.
Apple butter
,
a sauce made of apples stewed down in cider.
Bartlett.
Apple corer
,
an instrument for removing the cores from apples.
Apple fly
(Zool.)
,
any dipterous insect, the larva of which burrows in apples. Apple flies belong to the genera
Drosophila
and
Trypeta
.
Apple midge
(Zool.)
a small dipterous insect (
Sciara mali
), the larva of which bores in apples.
Apple of the eye
,
the pupil.
Apple of discord
,
a subject of contention and envy, so called from the mythological golden apple, inscribed “For the fairest,” which was thrown into an assembly of the gods by Eris, the goddess of discord. It was contended for by Juno, Minerva, and Venus, and was adjudged to the latter.
Apple of love
, or
Love apple
,
the tomato (
Lycopersicum esculentum
).
Apple of Peru
,
a large coarse herb (
Nicandra physaloides
) bearing pale blue flowers, and a bladderlike fruit inclosing a dry berry.
Apples of Sodom
,
a fruit described by ancient writers as externally of fair appearance but dissolving into smoke and ashes when plucked; Dead Sea apples. The name is often given to the fruit of
Solanum Sodomæum
, a prickly shrub with fruit not unlike a small yellow tomato.
Apple sauce
,
stewed apples.
[U. S.]
Apple snail
or
Apple shell
(Zool.)
,
a fresh-water, operculated, spiral shell of the genus
Ampullaria
.
Apple tart
,
a tart containing apples.
Apple tree
,
a tree which naturally bears apples. See
Apple, 2.
Apple wine
,
cider.
Apple worm
(Zool.)
,
the larva of a small moth (
Carpocapsa pomonella
) which burrows in the interior of apples. See
Codling moth
.
Dead Sea Apple
.
(a)
pl.
Apples of Sodom. Also
Fig.
“To seek the Dead Sea apples of politics.”
S. B. Griffin.
(b)
A kind of gallnut coming from Arabia. See
Gallnut
.

Ap′ple

(ăp′p’l)
,
Verb.
I.
To grow like an apple; to bear apples.
Holland.

Webster 1828 Edition


Apple

AP'PLE

, n.
1.
The fruit of the apple tree, [pyrus malus,] from which cider is made.
2.
The apple of the eye is the pupil.
Apple of love, or love apple, the tomato, or lycopersicum, a species of Solanum. The stalk is herbaceous, with oval, pinnated leaves, and small yellow flowers. The berry is smooth, soft, of a yellow or reddish color, of the size of a plum. It is used in soups and broths.

AP'PLE

,
Verb.
T.
To form like an apple.

Definition 2021


Apple

Apple

See also: apple and äpple

English

Proper noun

Apple

  1. (with "the") A nickname for New York City, usually “the Big Apple”.
  2. A multimedia corporation (Apple Corps) and record company (Apple Records) founded by the Beatles.
  3. The company Apple Inc., formerly Apple Computer, that produces computers and other digital devices.
  4. A computer produced by the company Apple Inc.
    • 1984, Douglas Adams, So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish
      Arthur bought the Apple anyway. Over a few days he also acquired some astronomical software, plotted the movements of stars, drew rough little diagrams of how he seemed to remember the stars to have been []
  5. (rare) A female given name.

Translations

Anagrams


Polish

Etymology

English Apple

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛpl/

Proper noun

Apple m

  1. Apple (name of the company Apple Inc.)
Declension

Spanish

Proper noun

Apple

  1. Apple (name of the company Apple Inc.)

apple

apple

See also: Apple and äpple

English

A red apple

Noun

apple (plural apples)

  1. A common, round fruit produced by the tree Malus domestica, cultivated in temperate climates. [from 9th c.]
    • c. 1378, William Langland, Piers Plowman:
      I prayed pieres to pulle adown an apple.
    • 1815, Jane Austen, Emma:
      Not that I had any doubt before – I have so often heard Mr. Woodhouse recommend a baked apple.
    • 2013, John Vallins, The Guardian, 28 Oct 2013:
      Close by and under cover, I watched the juicing process. Apples were washed, then tipped, stalks and all, into the crusher and reduced to pulp.
  2. Any of various tree-borne fruits or vegetables especially considered as resembling an apple; also (with qualifying words) used to form the names of other specific fruits such as custard apple, thorn apple etc. [from 9th c.]
    • 1658, trans. Giambattista della Porta, Natural Magick, I.16:
      In Persia there grows a deadly tree, whose Apples are Poison, and present death.
    • 1784, James Cook, A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean, II:
      Otaheite […] is remarkable for producing great quantities of that delicious fruit we called apples, which are found in none of the others, except Eimeo.
    • 1825, Theodric Romeyn Beck, Elements of Medical Jurisprudence, 2nd edition, page 565:
      Hippomane mancinella. (Manchineel-tree.) Dr. Peysonnel relates that a soldier, who was a slave with the Turks, eat some of the apples of this tree, and was soon seized with a swelling and pain of the abdomen.
  3. The fruit of the Tree of Knowledge, eaten by Adam and Eve according to post-Biblical Christian tradition; the forbidden fruit. [from 11th c.]
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book X:
      Him by fraud I have seduced / From his Creator; and, the more to encrease / Your wonder, with an apple […].
    • 1985, Barry Reckord, The White Witch:
      Woman ate the apple, and discovered sex, and lost all shame, and lift up her fig—leaf, and she must suffer the pains of ****. Monthly.
  4. A tree of the genus Malus, especially one cultivated for its edible fruit; the apple tree. [from 15th c.]
    • 1913, John Weathers, Commercial Gardening, page 38:
      If the grafted portion of an Apple or other tree were examined after one hundred years, the old cut surfaces would still be present, for mature or ripened wood, being dead, never unites.
    • 2000 PA Thomas, Trees: Their Natural History, page 227:
      This allows a weak plant to benefit from the strong roots of another, or a vigorous tree (such as an apple) to be kept small by growing on 'dwarfing rootstock'.
    • 2009, Sid Gardner, The Faults of the Owens Valley, ISBN 9781440177927, page 34:
      Used to be apple orchards, used to be the river and irrigation ditches that watered the apples, used to be mining towns.
    • 2012, Terri Reid, The Everything Guide to Living Off the Grid, page 77:
      Other fruit trees, like apples, need well-drained soil.
  5. The wood of the apple tree. [from 19th c.]
  6. (in the plural, Cockney rhyming slang) Short for apples and pears, slang for stairs. [from 20th c.]
  7. (baseball, slang, obsolete) The ball in baseball. [from 20th c.]
  8. (informal) When smiling, the round, fleshy part of the cheeks between the eyes and the corners of the mouth.
  9. (pejorative, ethnic slur) A Native American or red-skinned person who acts and/or thinks like a white (Caucasian) person.
    • 1998, Opal J. Moore, “Git That Gal a Red Dress: A Conversation Between Female Faculty at a State School in Virginia”, in Daryl Cumber Dance, editor, Honey, Hush!: An Anthology of African American Women's Humor, W. W. Norton & Company, ISBN 0393045579, page 537:
      The presenter, close to tears, told the audience that she's really an apple—white on the inside and red on the outside—Native American.
    • 2012 November 12, Joel Spring, The Cultural Transformation of A Native American Family and Its Tribe 1763-1995: A Basket of Apples, Routledge, ISBN 1136494715, ch. 9:
      My ancestors five generations removed were "apples" who were "White" on the inside and "Red" on the outside.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Anagrams

References

  1. etymonline
  2. dictionary.com