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Webster 1913 Edition


Spout

Spout

(spout)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Spouted
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Spouting
.]
[Cf. Sw.
sputa
,
spruta
, to spout, D.
spuit
a spout,
spuiten
to spout, and E.
spurt
,
sprit
, v.,
sprout
,
sputter
; or perhaps akin to E.
spit
to eject from the mouth.]
1.
To throw out forcibly and abundantly, as liquids through an orifice or a pipe; to eject in a jet;
as, an elephant
spouts
water from his trunk
.
Who kept Jonas in the fish’s maw
Till he was
spouted
up at Ninivee?
Chaucer.
Next on his belly floats the mighty whale . . .
He
spouts
the tide.
Creech.
2.
To utter magniloquently; to recite in an oratorical or pompous manner.
Pray,
spout
some French, son.
Beau. & Fl.
3.
To pawn; to pledge;
as, to
spout
a watch
.
[Cant]

Spout

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To issue with violence, or in a jet, as a liquid through a narrow orifice, or from a spout;
as, water
spouts
from a hole; blood
spouts
from an artery
.
All the glittering hill
Is bright with
spouting
rills.
Thomson.
2.
To eject water or liquid in a jet.
3.
To utter a speech, especially in a pompous manner.

Spout

,
Noun.
[Cf. Sw.
spruta
a squirt, a syringe. See
Spout
,
Verb.
T.
]
1.
That through which anything spouts; a discharging lip, pipe, or orifice; a tube, pipe, or conductor of any kind through which a liquid is poured, or by which it is conveyed in a stream from one place to another;
as, the
spout
of a teapot; a
spout
for conducting water from the roof of a building.
Addison.
“A conduit with three issuing spouts.”
Shak.
In whales . . . an ejection thereof [water] is contrived by a fistula, or
spout
, at the head.
Sir T. Browne.
From silver
spouts
the grateful liquors glide.
Pope.
2.
A trough for conducting grain, flour, etc., into a receptacle.
3.
A discharge or jet of water or other liquid, esp. when rising in a column; also, a waterspout.
To put up the spout
,
To shove up the spout
, or
To pop up the spout
,
to pawn or pledge at a pawnbroker's; – in allusion to the spout up which the pawnbroker sent the ticketed articles.
[Cant]

Webster 1828 Edition


Spout

SPOUT

,
Noun.
[G., to spit, and spotten is to mock, banter, sport. These are of one family; spout retaining nearly the primary and literal meaning. See Bud and Pout.]
1.
A pipe, or a projecting mouth of a vessel, useful in directing the stream of a liquid poured out; as the spout of a pitcher, of a tea pot or water pot.
2.
A pipe conducting water from another pipe, or from a trough on a house.
3.
A violent discharge of water raised in a column at sea, like a whirlwind, or by a whirlwind. [See Water-spout.]

SPOUT

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To throw out, as liquids through a narrow orifice or pipe; as, an elephant spouts water from his trunk.
Next on his belly floats the mighty whale--He spouts the tide.
2.
To throw out words with affected gravity; to mouth.

SPOUT

,
Verb.
I.
To issue with violence, as a liquid through a narrow orifice or from a spout; as, water spouts from a cask or a spring; blood spouts from a vein.
All the glittering hill is bright with spouting rills.

Definition 2022


spout

spout

English

Noun

spout (plural spouts)

  1. a tube or lip through which liquid is poured or discharged
    I dropped my china teapot, and its spout has broken.
  2. a stream of liquid
  3. the mixture of air and water thrown up from the blowhole of a whale

Coordinate terms

  • (tube through which liquid is discharged): nozzle

Translations

Verb

spout (third-person singular simple present spouts, present participle spouting, simple past and past participle spouted)

  1. (intransitive) To gush forth in a jet or stream
    Water spouts from a hole.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To eject water or liquid in a jet.
    The whale spouted.
    • Creech
      The mighty whale [] spouts the tide.
  3. To speak tediously or pompously.
  4. To utter magniloquently; to recite in an oratorical or pompous manner.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      Pray, spout some French, son.
  5. (slang, dated) To pawn; to pledge.
    to spout a watch

Translations

Anagrams