Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Shroud

Shroud

(shroud)
,
Noun.
[OE.
shroud
,
shrud
,
schrud
, AS.
scrūd
a garment, clothing; akin to Icel.
skruð
the shrouds of a ship, furniture of a church, a kind of stuff, Sw.
skrud
dress, attire, and E.
shred
. See
Shred
, and cf.
Shrood
.]
1.
That which clothes, covers, conceals, or protects; a garment.
Piers Plowman.
Swaddled, as new born, in sable
shrouds
.
Sandys.
2.
Especially, the dress for the dead; a winding sheet.
“A dead man in his shroud.”
Shak.
3.
That which covers or shelters like a shroud.
Jura answers through her misty
shroud
.
Byron.
4.
A covered place used as a retreat or shelter, as a cave or den; also, a vault or crypt.
[Obs.]
The
shroud
to which he won
His fair-eyed oxen.
Chapman.
A vault, or
shroud
, as under a church.
Withals.
5.
The branching top of a tree; foliage.
[R.]
The Assyrian wad a cedar in Lebanon, with fair branches and with a shadowing
shroad
.
Ezek. xxxi. 3.
6.
pl.
(Naut.)
A set of ropes serving as stays to support the masts. The lower shrouds are secured to the sides of vessels by heavy iron bolts and are passed around the head of the lower masts.
7.
(Mach.)
One of the two annular plates at the periphery of a water wheel, which form the sides of the buckets; a shroud plate.
Bowsprit shrouds
(Naut.)
,
ropes extending from the head of the bowsprit to the sides of the vessel.
Futtock shrouds
(Naut.)
,
iron rods connecting the topmast rigging with the lower rigging, passing over the edge of the top.
Shroud plate
.
(a)
(Naut.)
An iron plate extending from the dead-eyes to the ship’s side
.
Ham. Nav. Encyc.
(b)
(Mach.)
A shroud. See def. 7, above.

Shroud

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Shrouded
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Shrouding
.]
[Cf. AS.
scr[GREEK]dan
. See
Shroud
,
Noun.
]
1.
To cover with a shroud; especially, to inclose in a winding sheet; to dress for the grave.
The ancient Egyptian mummies were
shrouded
in a number of folds of linen besmeared with gums.
Bacon.
2.
To cover, as with a shroud; to protect completely; to cover so as to conceal; to hide; to veil.
One of these trees, with all his young ones, may
shroud
four hundred horsemen.
Sir W. Raleigh.
Some tempest rise,
And blow out all the stars that light the skies,
To
shroud
my shame.
Dryden.

Shroud

,
Verb.
I.
To take shelter or harbor.
[Obs.]
If your stray attendance be yet lodged,
Or
shroud
within these limits.
Milton.

Shroud

,
Verb.
T.
To lop. See
Shrood
.
[Prov. Eng.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Shroud

SHROUD

,
Noun.
1. A shelter; a cover; that which covers, conceals or protects.
Swaddled, as new born, in sable shrouds. Sandys.
2. The dress of the dead; a winding sheet.
3. Shroud or shrouds of a ship, a range of large ropes extending from the head of a mast to the right and left sides of the ship, to support the mast; as the main shrouds; fore shrouds; mizen shrouds. There are also futtock shrouds, bowsprit shrouds, &c.
4. A branch of a tree. [Not proper.]

SHROUD

,
Verb.
T.
1. To cover; to shelter from danger or annoyance.
Under your beams I will me safely shroud. Spenser.
One of these trees with all its young ones, may shroud four hundred horsemen. Raleigh.
2. To dress for the grave; to cover; as a dead body.
The ancient Egyptian mummies were shrouded in several folds of linen besmeared with gums. Bacon.
3. To cover; to conceal to hide; as, to be shrouded in darkness.
-Some tempest rise,
And blow out all the stars that light the skies,
To shroud my name. Dryden.
4. To defend; to protect by hiding.
So Venus from prevailing Greeks did shroud
The hope of Rome, and saved him in a cloud. Waller.
5. To overwhelm; as, to be shrouded in despair.
6. To lop the branches of a tree. [Unusual or improper.]

SHROUD

,
Verb.
I.
To take shelter or harbor.
If your stray attendants be yet lodg'd
Or shroud within these limits- Milton.

Definition 2022


shroud

shroud

English

Noun

shroud (plural shrouds)

  1. That which clothes, covers, conceals, or protects; a garment.
    • Sandys
      swaddled, as new born, in sable shrouds
  2. Especially, the dress for the dead; a winding sheet.
    • 1826, Mary Shelley, The Last Man, volume 3, chapter 2
      Yet let us goǃ England is in her shroud - we may not enchain ourselves to a corpse.
    • Shakespeare
      a dead man in his shroud
  3. That which covers or shelters like a shroud.
    • Byron
      Jura answers through her misty shroud.
  4. A covered place used as a retreat or shelter, as a cave or den; also, a vault or crypt.
    • Chapman
      The shroud to which he won / His fair-eyed oxen.
    • Withals
      a vault, or shroud, as under a church
  5. The branching top of a tree; foliage.
    • 1611, King James Bible, “xxxi.iii”, in Ezekiel, Barker edition:
      Behold, the Assyrian was a Cedar in Lebanon with faire branches, and with a shadowing shrowd, and of an hie stature, and his top was among the thicke boughes.
  6. (nautical) A rope or cable serving to support the mast sideways.
  7. One of the two annular plates at the periphery of a water wheel, which form the sides of the buckets; a shroud plate.

Synonyms

Translations

Verb

shroud (third-person singular simple present shrouds, present participle shrouding, simple past and past participle shrouded)

  1. To cover with a shroud.
    • Francis Bacon
      The ancient Egyptian mummies were shrouded in a number of folds of linen besmeared with gums.
  2. To conceal or hide from view, as if by a shroud.
    The details of the plot were shrouded in mystery.
    The truth behind their weekend retreat was shrouded in obscurity.
    • Sir Walter Raleigh
      One of these trees, with all his young ones, may shroud four hundred horsemen.
    • Dryden
      Some tempest rise, / And blow out all the stars that light the skies, / To shroud my shame.
  3. To take shelter or harbour.
    • Milton
      If your stray attendance be yet lodged, / Or shroud within these limits.