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Webster 1913 Edition


Pall

Pall

(pa̤l)
,
Noun.
Same as
Pawl
.

Pall

,
Noun.
[OE.
pal
, AS.
pæl
, from L.
pallium
cover, cloak, mantle, pall; cf. L.
palla
robe, mantle.]
1.
An outer garment; a cloak mantle.
His lion’s skin changed to a
pall
of gold.
Spenser.
2.
A kind of rich stuff used for garments in the Middle Ages.
[Obs.]
Wyclif (Esther viii. 15).
3.
(R. C. Ch.)
Same as
Pallium
.
About this time Pope Gregory sent two archbishop's
palls
into England, – the one for London, the other for York.
Fuller.
4.
(Her.)
A figure resembling the Roman Catholic pallium, or pall, and having the form of the letter Y.
5.
A large cloth, esp., a heavy black cloth, thrown over a coffin at a funeral; sometimes, also, over a tomb.
Warriors carry the warrior's
pall
.
Tennyson.
6.
(Eccl.)
A piece of cardboard, covered with linen and embroidered on one side; – used to put over the chalice.

Pall

,
Verb.
T.
To cloak.
[R.]
Shak

Pall

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Palled
(pa̤ld)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Palling
.]
[Either shortened fr.
appall
, or fr. F.
pâlir
to grow pale. Cf.
Appall
,
Pale
,
Adj.
]
To become vapid, tasteless, dull, or insipid; to lose strength, life, spirit, or taste;
as, the liquor
palls
.
Beauty soon grows familiar to the lover,
Fades in the eye, and
palls
upon the sense.
Addisin.

Pall

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To make vapid or insipid; to make lifeless or spiritless; to dull; to weaken.
Chaucer.
Reason and reflection . . .
pall
all his enjoyments.
Atterbury.
2.
To satiate; to cloy;
as, to
pall
the appetite
.

Pall

,
Noun.
Nausea.
[Obs.]
Shaftesbury.

Webster 1828 Edition


Pall

PALL

,
Noun.
[L. pallium.]
1.
A cloke; a mantle of state.
2.
The mantle of an archbishop.
3.
The cloth thrown over a dead body at funerals.

PALL

,
Noun.
In heraldry, a figure like the Greek.

PALL

,
Verb.
T.
To cloke; to cover or invest.

PALL

,
Verb.
I.
[Gr. old.]
1.
To become vapid; to lose strength, life, spirit or taste; to become insipid; as, the liquor palls.
Beauty soon grows familiar to the lover,
Fades in the eye and palls upon the sense.

PALL

,
Verb.
T.
To make vapid or insipid.
Reason and reflection--blunt the edge of the keenest desires, and pall all his enjoyments.
1.
To make spiritless; to dispirit; to depress.
The more we raise our love,
The more we pall and cool and kill his ardor.
2.
To weaken; to impair; as, to pall fortune.
3.
To cloy; as the palled appetite.

Definition 2022


pall

pall

See also: Páll and pal'l'

English

Noun

pall (plural palls)

  1. (archaic) Fine cloth, especially purple cloth used for robes.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wyclif Bible (Esther viii. 15) to this entry?)
  2. (Christianity) A cloth used for various purposes on the altar in a church.
  3. (Christianity) A piece of cardboard, covered with linen and embroidered on one side, used to cover the chalice.
  4. (Christianity) A pallium (woollen vestment in Roman Catholicism).
    • Fuller
      About this time Pope Gregory sent two archbishop's palls into England, the one for London, the other for York.
  5. (heraldry) A figure resembling the Roman Catholic pallium, or pall, and having the form of the letter Y.
  6. A heavy canvas, especially one laid over a coffin or tomb.
    • 1942, Rebecca West, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, Canongate (2006), page 150:
      Thirty years or so later, a woman was put to death for stealing the purple pall from his sarcophagus, a strange, crazy crime, []
  7. An outer garment; a cloak or mantle.
    • Shakespeare
      His lion's skin changed to a pall of gold.
  8. (obsolete) nausea
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shaftesbury to this entry?)
  9. A feeling of gloom.
    A pall came over the crowd when the fourth goal was scored.
    The early election results cast a pall over what was supposed to be a celebration.
Derived terms
Synonyms
  • (heraldry): pairle
Translations

Verb

pall (third-person singular simple present palls, present participle palling, simple past and past participle palled)

  1. To cloak.
    Lady Macbeth: Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of **** (Macbeth Act I Scene v lines 48–9).

Etymology 2

Aphetism from appall. Possibly influenced by the figurative meaning of the unrelated noun.

Verb

pall (third-person singular simple present palls, present participle palling, simple past and past participle palled)

  1. (transitive) To make vapid or insipid; to make lifeless or spiritless; to dull; to weaken.
    • Atterbury
      Reason and reflection [] pall all his enjoyments.
  2. (intransitive) To become vapid, tasteless, dull, or insipid; to lose strength, life, spirit, or taste.
    The liquor palls.
    • Addison
      Beauty soon grows familiar to the lover, / Fades in the eye, and palls upon the sense.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter VI
      We are all becoming accustomed to adventure. It is beginning to pall on us. We suffered no casualties and there was no illness.

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *palei-, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pel- 'to speak with a loud voice'. Cognate to Gothic spillon (spillon, to proclaim)[1].

Verb

pall (first-person singular past tense palla, participle pallë/pallur)

  1. To cry, hee-haw.
Related terms

References

  1. Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.365

Estonian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pˈɑlʲː/

Noun

pall (genitive palli, partitive palli)

  1. (sports) ball

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse pallr

Noun

pall m (definite singular pallen, indefinite plural paller, definite plural pallene)

  1. a pallet (portable platform on which goods are stacked for transport)
  2. a podium (especially for winners of a sporting event)

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse pallr

Noun

pall m (definite singular pallen, indefinite plural pallar, definite plural pallane)

  1. a pallet (portable platform on which goods are stacked for transport)
  2. a podium (especially for winners of a sporting event)

References


Swedish

pall[4] = pawl (2)

Pronunciation

Noun

pall c

  1. a stool; a chair without armrests or a back
  2. (sports) a podium for prize ceremonies
  3. a pallet; a movable platform, constructed to be moved by forklifts
  4. a pawl (a pin in a ratchet gear)
    att stå pall
    to cope, to stand against pressure
  5. (dated, slang) an apple

Declension

Inflection of pall 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pall pallen pallar pallarna
Genitive palls pallens pallars pallarnas

Derived terms

  • fotpall
  • lastpall
  • mjölkpall
  • palla
  • pallbrytning
  • palldragare
  • pallning
  • pallplacering
  • pallplats
  • pallvagn
  • prispall
  • stå pall

References


Welsh

Noun

pall m (plural pallon)

  1. tent

Synonyms