Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Globe

Globe

(glōb)
,
Noun.
[L.
globus
, perh. akin to L.
glomus
a ball of yarn, and E.
clump
,
golf
: cf. F.
globe
.]
1.
A round or spherical body, solid or hollow; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center; a ball; a sphere.
2.
Anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape;
as, the
globe
of the eye; the
globe
of a lamp.
3.
The earth; the terraqueous ball; – usually preceded by the definite article.
Locke.
4.
A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens;
as, a terrestrial or celestial
globe
; – called also
artificial globe
.
5.
A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; – a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square.
Him round
A
globe
of fiery seraphim inclosed.
Milton.
Globe amaranth
(Bot.)
,
a plant of the genus
Gomphrena
(
G. globosa
), bearing round heads of variously colored flowers, which long retain color when gathered.
Globe animalcule
,
a small, globular, locomotive organism (
Volvox globator
), once throught to be an animal, afterward supposed to be a colony of microscopic algæ.
Globe of compression
(Mil.)
,
a kind of mine producing a wide crater; – called also
overcharged mine
.
Globe daisy
(Bot.)
,
a plant or flower of the genus
Globularing
, common in Europe. The flowers are minute and form globular heads.
Globe sight
,
a form of front sight placed on target rifles.
Globe slater
(Zool.)
,
an isopod crustacean of the genus
Spheroma
.
Globe thistle
(Bot.)
,
a thistlelike plant with the flowers in large globular heads (
Cynara Scolymus
); also, certain species of the related genus
Echinops
.
Globe valve
.
(a)
A ball valve.
(b)
A valve inclosed in a globular chamber.
Knight.
Syn.
Globe
,
Sphere
,
Orb
,
Ball
.
Globe denotes a round, and usually a solid body; sphere is the term applied in astronomy to such a body, or to the concentric spheres or orbs of the old astronomers; orb is used, especially in poetry, for globe or sphere, and also for the pathway of a heavenly body; ball is applied to the heavenly bodies concieved of as impelled through space.

Globe

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Globed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Globing
.]
To gather or form into a globe.

Webster 1828 Edition


Globe

GLOBE

,
Noun.
[L. globus; Eng. clew. See Clew.]
1.
A round or spherical solid body; a ball; a sphere; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center.
2.
The earth; the terraqueous ball; so called, though not perfectly spherical.
3.
An artificial sphere of metal, paper or other matter, on whose convex surface is drawn a map or representation of the earth or of the heavens. That on which the several oceans, seas, continents, isles and countries of the earth are represented, is called a terrestrial globe. That which exhibits a delineation of the constellations in the heavens, is called a celestial globe.
4.
A body of soldiers formed into a circle.

GLOBE

,
Verb.
T.
To gather round or into a circle.

Definition 2021


Globe

Globe

See also: globe and glóbe

English

Proper noun

Globe

  1. A city in Arizona
  2. An unincorporated community in Wisconsin

globe

globe

See also: Globe and glóbe

English

A globe (model of Earth).

Noun

globe (plural globes)

  1. Any spherical (or nearly spherical) object.
    the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp
  2. The planet Earth.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of John Locke to this entry?)
    • 2013 July 19, Timothy Garton Ash, Where Dr Pangloss meets Machiavelli”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 18:
      Hidden behind thickets of acronyms and gorse bushes of detail, a new great game is under way across the globe. Some call it geoeconomics, but it's geopolitics too. The current power play consists of an extraordinary range of countries simultaneously sitting down to negotiate big free trade and investment agreements.
  3. A spherical model of Earth or any planet.
  4. (dated or Australia, South Africa) A light bulb.
    • 1920, Southern Pacific Company, Southern Pacific bulletin: volumes 9-10 (page 26)
      Don't ask for a new globe just because the old one needs dusting. The old-style carbon lamps wasted electricity when they began to fade and it was economy to replace them.
  5. A circular military formation used in Ancient Rome, corresponding to the modern infantry square.
    • Milton
      Him round / A globe of fiery seraphim enclosed.
  6. (slang, chiefly plural) A woman's breasts.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

globe (third-person singular simple present globes, present participle globing, simple past and past participle globed)

  1. To become spherical

Danish

Etymology

From French globe, from Latin globus (sphere, globe).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡloːbə/, [ˈɡ̊loːb̥ə]

Noun

globe c (singular definite globen, plural indefinite glober)

  1. globe

Synonyms

Derived terms

Inflection


French

Etymology

Borrowing from Latin globus.

Pronunciation

Noun

globe m (plural globes)

  1. globe

Related terms


Latin

Noun

globe

  1. vocative singular of globus

Middle French

Etymology

Borrowing from Latin globus.

Noun

globe m (plural globes)

  1. roll (of paper, etc.)
  2. globe (sphere showing a representation of the Earth)

Descendants

References

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (globe)
  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (globe, supplement)