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Webster 1913 Edition


Danger

Dan′ger

,
Noun.
[OE.
danger
,
daunger
, power, arrogance, refusal, difficulty, fr. OF.
dagier
,
dongier
(with same meaning), F.
danger
danger, fr. an assumed LL.
dominiarium
power, authority, from L.
dominium
power, property. See
Dungeon
,
Domain
,
Dame
.]
1.
Authority; jurisdiction; control.
[Obs.]
In
danger
had he . . . the young girls.
Chaucer.
2.
Power to harm; subjection or liability to penalty.
[Obs.]
See
In one’s danger
, below.
You stand within his
danger
, do you not?
Shakespeare
Covetousness of gains hath brought [them] in
danger
of this statute.
Robynson (More's Utopia).
3.
Exposure to injury, loss, pain, or other evil; peril; risk; insecurity.
4.
Difficulty; sparingness.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.
5.
Coyness; disdainful behavior.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.
In one's danger
,
in one's power; liable to a penalty to be inflicted by him.
[Obs.]
This sense is retained in the proverb, “Out of debt out of danger.”

Syn. – Peril; hazard; risk; jeopardy.
Danger
,
Peril
,
Hazard
,
Risk
,
Jeopardy
. Danger is the generic term, and implies some contingent evil in prospect. Peril is instant or impending danger; as, in peril of one's life. Hazard arises from something fortuitous or beyond our control; as, the hazard of the seas. Risk is doubtful or uncertain danger, often incurred voluntarily; as, to risk an engagement. Jeopardy is extreme danger. Danger of a contagious disease; the perils of shipwreck; the hazards of speculation; the risk of daring enterprises; a life brought into jeopardy.

Dan′ger

,
Verb.
T.
To endanger.
[Obs.]
Shak.

Webster 1828 Edition


Danger

DANGER

,
Noun.
Peril; risk; hazard; exposure to injury, loss, pain or other evil.
Our craft is in danger to be set at nought. Acts xix.
It is easy to boast of despising death, when there is no danger.

DANGER

,
Verb.
T.
To put in hazard; to expose to loss or injury.

Definition 2022


danger

danger

English

Noun

danger (plural dangers)

  1. (obsolete) Ability to harm; someone's dominion or power to harm or penalise. See In one's danger, below.
    "You stand within his danger, do you not?" (Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice, 4:1:180)
    • Robynson (More's Utopia)
      Covetousness of gains hath brought [them] in danger of this statute.
  2. (obsolete) Liability.
    • 1526, Bible, tr. William Tyndale, Matthew V:
      Thou shalt not kyll. Whosoever shall kyll, shalbe in daunger of iudgement.
  3. (obsolete) Difficulty; sparingness.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  4. (obsolete) Coyness; disdainful behavior.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  5. (obsolete) A place where one is in the hands of the enemy.
  6. Exposure to liable harm.
    "Danger is a good teacher, and makes apt scholars" (William Hazlitt, Table talk).
  7. An instance or cause of liable harm.
    "Two territorial questions..unsettled..each of which was a positive danger to the peace of Europe" (Times, 5 Sept. 3/2).
  8. Mischief.
    "We put a Sting in him, / That at his will he may doe danger with" (Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, 2:1:17).

Synonyms

  • See also Wikisaurus:danger

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

danger (third-person singular simple present dangers, present participle dangering, simple past and past participle dangered)

  1. (obsolete) To claim liability.
  2. (obsolete) To imperil; to endanger.
  3. (obsolete) To run the risk.

Quotations

  • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:danger.

Related terms

References

  1. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=danger&searchmode=none
  • Oxford English Dictionary

Anagrams


French

Etymology

From Old French dangier, alteration of Old French dongier (due to association with Latin damnum (damage)) from Vulgar Latin *domniārium (authority, power) from Latin dominus (lord, master).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɑ̃.ʒe/

Noun

danger m (plural dangers)

  1. danger
  2. jeopardy (danger of loss, harm, or failure)

Related terms

Anagrams