Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Bronze

Bronze

,
Noun.
[F.
bronze
, fr. It.
bronzo
brown, fr. OHG.
br[GREEK]n
, G.
braun
. See
Brown
,
Adj.
]
1.
An alloy of copper and tin, to which small proportions of other metals, especially zinc, are sometimes added. It is hard and sonorous, and is used for statues, bells, cannon, etc., the proportions of the ingredients being varied to suit the particular purposes. The varieties containing the higher proportions of tin are brittle, as in bell metal and speculum metal.
2.
A statue, bust, etc., cast in bronze.
A print, a
bronze
, a flower, a root.
Prior.
3.
A yellowish or reddish brown, the color of bronze; also, a pigment or powder for imitating bronze.
4.
Boldness; impudence; “brass.”
Imbrowned with native
bronze
, lo! Henley stands.
Pope.
Aluminium bronze
.
See under
Aluminium
.
Bronze age
,
an age of the world which followed the stone age, and was characterized by the use of implements and ornaments of copper or bronze.
Bronze powder
,
a metallic powder, used with size or in combination with painting, to give the appearance of bronze, gold, or other metal, to any surface.
Phosphor bronze
and
Silicious bronze
or
Silicium bronze
are made by adding phosphorus and silicon respectively to ordinary bronze, and are characterized by great tenacity.

Bronze

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Bronzed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Bronzing
.]
[Cf. F.
bronzer
. See
Bronze
,
Noun.
]
1.
To give an appearance of bronze to, by a coating of bronze powder, or by other means; to make of the color of bronze;
as, to
bronze
plaster casts; to
bronze
coins or medals
.
The tall
bronzed
black-eyed stranger.
W. Black.
2.
To make hard or unfeeling; to brazen.
The lawer who
bronzes
his bosom instead of his forehead.
Sir W. Scott.
Bronzed skin disease
.
(Pathol.)

Definition 2022


Bronze

Bronze

See also: bronze and bronzé

German

Noun

Bronze f (genitive Bronze, plural Bronzen)

  1. bronze

Declension

Derived terms

See also

bronze

bronze

See also: Bronze and bronzé

English

Noun

bronze (countable and uncountable, plural bronzes)

  1. (uncountable) A natural or man-made alloy of copper, usually of tin, but also with one or more other metals.
  2. (countable and uncountable) A reddish-brown colour, the colour of bronze.
    bronze colour:    
  3. (countable) A work of art made of bronze, especially a sculpture.
  4. A bronze medal.
  5. Boldness; impudence; brass.
    • Alexander Pope
      Embrown'd with native bronze, lo! Henley stands.

Translations

Adjective

bronze (comparative more bronze, superlative most bronze)

  1. Made of bronze metal.
    • 1907, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, “chapter I”, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: A. L. Burt Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 4241346:
      The house was a big elaborate limestone affair, evidently new. Winter sunshine sparkled on lace-hung casement, on glass marquise, and the burnished bronze foliations of grille and door.
  2. Having a reddish-brown colour.
  3. (of the skin) Tanned; darkened as a result of exposure to the sun.
    • 2016, Kit Moulton, Annabella (page 108)
      That girl was dynamite. Dark hair with killer blue eyes, bronze skin, and an exquisite full-figured body.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

bronze (third-person singular simple present bronzes, present participle bronzing, simple past and past participle bronzed)

  1. (transitive) To plate with bronze.
    My mother bronzed my first pair of baby shoes.
  2. (transitive) To color bronze; (of the sun) to tan.
    • 1925, DuBose Heyward, Porgy, London: Jonathan Cape, Part IV, p. 137,
      The sun was so low that its level rays shot through the tunnels of the forest and bronzed its ceiling of woven leaves when Bess returned to the clearing.
    • 1961, Freya Stark, Dust in the Lion's Paw: Autobiography 1939-1946, New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, Chapter 8, p. 122,
      North is the bay of Acre, lovely in shape, and, far, far beyond, the cloudy vision of Hermon, its huge landscape now only attainable with a police pass—beautifully solitary except for good-looking young men of the police patrols, all fit and bronzed.
  3. (intransitive, of the skin) To change to a bronze or tan colour due to exposure to the sun.
    • 2006, Melissa Lassor, "Out of Darkness", page 124 in Watching Time
      His skin began to bronze as he worked in our garden each day.
  4. (transitive) To make hard or unfeeling; to brazen.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      the lawyer who bronzes his bosom instead of his forehead

Translations

See also

Anagrams


Catalan

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /ˈbɾon.zə/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈbɾon.zə/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbɾon.ze/

Noun

bronze m (plural bronzes)

  1. bronze (metal)
  2. bronze medal

Derived terms

  • bronzejar-se
  • bronzejat
  • Edat del bronze

Danish

Etymology

Borrowing from French bronze.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brɔnɡsə/, [ˈb̥ʁʌŋsə]

Noun

bronze c (singular definite bronzen, plural indefinite bronzer)

  1. (uncountable) bronze (element; colour)
  2. (countable) bronze (work of art made of bronze), bronze medal

Inflection

External links


French

Etymology

Italian bronzo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʁɔ̃z/

Noun

bronze m (plural bronzes)

  1. bronze (metal, work of art)

Derived terms

  • mouler un bronze

Anagrams


Greenlandic

Etymology

Borrowing from Danish bronze; see English bronze etymology

Noun

bronze

  1. bronze

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowing from French bronze, from Italian bronzo, either from Byzantine Greek βροντησίον (brontēsíon), presumably from Βρεντήσιον (Brentḗsion, Brindisi), known for the manufacture of bronze; or ultimately from Persian برنج (birinj, biranj, brass) ~ پرنگ (piring, copper).

Pronunciation

Noun

bronze m (plural bronzes)

  1. bronze
  2. skin tan

Related terms