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Webster 1913 Edition


Ambush

Am′bush

(ăm′boŏsh)
,
Noun.
[F.
embûche
, fr. the verb. See
Ambush
,
Verb.
T.
]
1.
A disposition or arrangement of troops for attacking an enemy unexpectedly from a concealed station. Hence: Unseen peril; a device to entrap; a snare.
Heaven, whose high walls fear no assault or siege
Or
ambush
from the deep.
Milton.
2.
A concealed station, where troops or enemies lie in wait to attack by surprise.
Bold in close
ambush
, base in open field.
Dryden.
3.
The troops posted in a concealed place, for attacking by surprise; liers in wait.
[Obs.]
The
ambush
arose quickly out of their place.
Josh. viii. 19.
To lay an ambush
,
to post a force in ambush.

Am′bush

(ăm′boŏsh)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Ambushed
(ăm′boŏshd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Ambushing
.]
[OE.
enbussen
,
enbushen
, OF.
embushier
,
embuissier
, F.
embûcher
,
embusquer
, fr. LL.
imboscare
;
in
+ LL.
boscus
,
buscus
, a wood; akin to G.
bush
, E.
bush
. See
Ambuscade
,
Bush
.]
1.
To station in ambush with a view to surprise an enemy.
By
ambushed
men behind their temple laid,
We have the king of Mexico betrayed.
Dryden.
2.
To attack by ambush; to waylay.

Am′bush

,
Verb.
I.
To lie in wait, for the purpose of attacking by surprise; to lurk.
Nor saw the snake that
ambushed
for his prey.
Trumbull.

Webster 1828 Edition


Ambush

AM'BUSH

, n.
1.
A private or concealed station, where troops lie in wait to attack their enemy by surprise.
2.
The state of lying concealed, for the purpose of attacking by surprise; a lying in wait.
3.
The troops posted in a concealed place for attacking by surprise.
Lay thee an ambush for the city. Josh. 8.

AM'BUSH

,
Verb.
T.
To lie in wait for; to surprise, by assailing unexpectedly from a concealed place.

AM'BUSH

,
Verb.
I.
To lie in wait, for the purpose of attacking by surprise.
Nor saw the snake, that ambushed for his prey.

Definition 2022


ambush

ambush

English

Noun

ambush (plural ambushes)

  1. The act of concealing oneself and lying in wait to attack by surprise.
  2. An attack launched from a concealed position.
    • Milton
      Heaven, whose high walls fear no assault or siege / Or ambush from the deep.
  3. The troops posted in a concealed place, for attacking by surprise; those who lie in wait.
    • Bible, Josh. viii. 19
      The ambush arose quickly out of their place.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

ambush (third-person singular simple present ambushes, present participle ambushing, simple past and past participle ambushed)

  1. (transitive) To station in ambush with a view to surprise an enemy.
    • Dryden
      By ambushed men behind their temple laid / We have the king of Mexico betrayed.
  2. (transitive) To attack by ambush; to waylay.

Translations