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Webster 1913 Edition


Advocate

Ad′vo-cate

,
Noun.
[OE.
avocat
,
avocet
, OF.
avocat
, fr. L.
advocatus
, one summoned or called to another; properly the p. p. of
advocare
to call to, call to one’s aid;
ad
+
vocare
to call. See
Advowee
,
Avowee
,
Vocal
.]
1.
One who pleads the cause of another. Specifically: One who pleads the cause of another before a tribunal or judicial court; a counselor.
☞ In the English and American Law, advocate is the same as “counsel,” “counselor,” or “barrister.” In the civil and ecclesiastical courts, the term signifies the same as “counsel” at the common law.
2.
One who defends, vindicates, or espouses any cause by argument; a pleader;
as, an
advocate
of free trade, an
advocate
of truth
.
3.
Christ, considered as an intercessor.
We have an
Advocate
with the Father.
1 John ii. 1.
Faculty of advocates
(Scot.)
,
the Scottish bar in Edinburgh.
Lord advocate
(Scot.)
,
the public prosecutor of crimes, and principal crown lawyer.
Judge advocate
.
See under
Judge
.

Ad′vo-cate

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Advocated
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Advocating
.]
[See
Advocate
,
Noun.
,
Advoke
,
Avow
.]
To plead in favor of; to defend by argument, before a tribunal or the public; to support, vindicate, or recommend publicly.
To
advocate
the cause of thy client.
Bp. Sanderson (1624).
This is the only thing distinct and sensible, that has been
advocated
.
Burke.
Eminent orators were engaged to
advocate
his cause.
Mitford.

Ad′vo-cate

,
Verb.
I.
To act as advocate.
[Obs.]
Fuller.

Webster 1828 Edition


Advocate

AD'VOCATE

,
Noun.
[L. advocatus, from advoco, to call for, to plead for; of ad and voco, to call. See Vocal.]
1.
Advocate, in its primary sense, signifies, one who pleads the cause of another in a court of civil law. Hence,
2.
One who pleads the cause of another before any tribunal or judicial court, as a barrister in the English courts. We say, a man is a learned lawyer and an able advocate.
In Europe, advocates have different titles, according to their particular duties.
Consistorial advocates, in Rome, appear before the Consistory, in opposition to the disposal of benefices.
Elective advocates are chosen by a bishop, abbot, or chapter, with license from the prince.
Feudal advocates were of a military kind, and to attach them to the church, had grants of land, with power to lead the vassals of the church war.
Fiscal advocates, in ancient Rome, defended causes in which the public revenue was concerned.
Juridical advocates became judges, in consequence of their attending causes in the earl's court.
Matricular advocates defended the cathedral churches.
Military advocates were employed by the church to defend it by arms, when force gave law to Europe.
Some advocates were called nominative, from their being nominated by the pope or king; some regular, from their being qualified by a proper course of study. Some were supreme; others, subordinate.
Advocate, in the German polity, is a magistrate, appointed in the emperor's name, to administer justice.
Faculty of advocates, in Scotland, is a society of eminent lawyers, who practice in the highest courts, and who are admitted members only upon the severest examination, at three different times. It consists of about two hundred members, and from this body are vacancies on the bench usually supplied.
Lord advocate, in Scotland, the principal crown lawyer, or prosecutor of crimes.
Judge advocate, in courts martial, a person who manages the prosecution.
In English and American courts, advocates are the same as counsel, or counselors. In England,they are of two degrees, barristers and serjeants; the former, being apprentices or learners, cannot, by ancient custom, be admitted serjeants, till of sixteen years standing.
3.
One who defends, vindicates, or espouses a cause, by argument; one who is friendly to; as, an advocate for peace, or for the oppressed.
In scripture, Christ is called an advocate for his people.
We have an advocate with the father. 1John, 2.

AD'VOCATE

,
Verb.
T.
To plead in favor of; to defend by argument, before a tribunal; to support or vindicate.
Those who advocate a discrimination.
The Duke of York advocated the amendment.
The Earl of Buckingham advocated the original resolution.
The idea of a legislature, consisting of a single branch, though advocated by some, was generally reprobated.
How little claim persons, who advocate this sentiment, really posses to be considered calvinists, will appear from the following quotation.
The most eminent orators were engaged to advocate his cause.
A part only of the body, whose cause be advocates, coincide with him in judgment.

Definition 2023


advocate

advocate

English

Noun

advocate (plural advocates)

  1. Someone whose job is to speak for someone's case in a court of law; a counsel. [from 14th c.]
  2. Anyone who argues the case of another; an intercessor. [from 14th c.]
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Richard III, First Folio 1623:
      I neuer did incense his Maiestie / Against the Duke of Clarence, but haue bin / An earnest aduocate to plead for him.
  3. A person who speaks in support of something. [from 18th c.]
    • 2011, Alix Lee, The Guardian, 9 Oct 2011:
      He became a tireless advocate for the needs of adults with IMD throughout Britain and internationally.
  4. A person who supports others to make their voices heard, or ideally for them to speak up for themselves.
    Since she started working with her advocate, she has become much more confident.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

advocate (third-person singular simple present advocates, present participle advocating, simple past and past participle advocated)

  1. (transitive) To plead in favour of; to defend by argument, before a tribunal or the public; to support, vindicate, or recommend publicly.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Bishop Sanderson
      To advocate the cause of thy client.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Burke
      This is the only thing distinct and sensible, that has been advocated.
  2. (transitive) To encourage support for something.
    I like trees, but I do not advocate living in them.
  3. (intransitive, with for) To engage in advocacy.
    We have been advocating for changes in immigration law.

Synonyms

  • See also Wikisaurus:advise

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams


Latin

Verb

advocāte

  1. first-person plural present active imperative of advocō