Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Wald

Wald

,
Noun.
[AS.
weald
. See
Wold
.]
A forest; – used as a termination of names. See
Weald
.

Definition 2021


Wald

Wald

See also: wald

German

Noun

Wald m (genitive Waldes or Walds, plural Wälder, diminutive Wäldchen n)

  1. forest, wood, woods, woodland

Declension

Derived terms

wald

wald

See also: Wald

English

Alternative forms

  • wauld (Scotland)

Verb

wald (third-person singular simple present walds, present participle walding, simple past and past participle walded)

  1. (Britain dialectal, transitive, intransitive) To govern; inherit.

Etymology 2

From Middle English wald, iwald, from Old English ġeweald (might, power, possession, control, command, dominion, bridle, protection, subjection, groin, pudenda), from Proto-Germanic *waldą (might, power, main), from Proto-Indo-European *waldʰ- (to be strong, be powerful, prevail, possess). Cognate with German Gewalt (force, power, control, violence), Swedish våld (force, violence).

Noun

wald (plural walds)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Power; strength.
  2. (Britain dialectal) Command; control; possession.
Related terms

Etymology 3

From Middle English wald, from Old English weald (high land covered with wood, woods, forest), from Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old High German wald (German Wald) and Old Norse vǫllr (Faroese vøllur, Norwegian voll, Icelandic völlur).

Noun

wald (plural walds)

  1. Forest; woods.
    • 1812, Walter Scott, Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Digitized edition, page 124:
      … we still recognize the ancient traditions of the Goths, concerning the wald-elven,…
    • 1853, Robert Simpson, History of Sanquhar, page 16:
      the romantic pass of the "wald path," along which runs a spur of an old Roman road
    • 1857, George Bradshaw, Bradshaw's illustrated hand-book to Switzerland and the Tyrol, Digitized edition, published 2006, page 1:
      MARDEN and STAPLEHURST—All this part of the line, through the Weald of Kent, i.e., the wald or forest, which still prevails here.

References


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • wæld

Etymology

From Old English weald (high land covered with wood, woods, forest), from Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old High German wald (German Wald) and Old Norse vǫllr (Faroese vøllur, Norwegian voll, Icelandic völlur).

Noun

wald (plural walds or walden)

  1. a wooded area, forested land, the woods; a wooded tract, forest preserve; the forest as a wild place
    Þe wurmes & te wilde deor ... o þis wald wunieð. St. Margaret of Antioch, c1225
    Ȝif æi mon hine mihte ifinden uppe þissere wælden, ... Layamon's Brut, c1275
    Beliagog in þat nede Fond him riche wald To fine. Sir Tristrem, c1330
    Was nouthire waldis in þar walke ne watir to fynde. Wars of Alexander, 1450

References

  • Middle English Dictionary

Old Danish

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old Norse vald.

Noun

wald

  1. force, violence

Descendants


Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old English weald, Old Norse vǫllr

Noun

wald m

  1. forest

Descendants


Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old English weald, Old Norse vǫllr.

Noun

wald m

  1. a forest

Descendants

  • Middle Low German wolt