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Webster 1913 Edition


Sacrament

Sac′ra-ment

,
Noun.
[L.
sacramentum
an oath, a sacred thing, a mystery, a sacrament, fr.
sacrare
to declare as sacred,
sacer
sacred: cf. F.
sacrement
. See
Sacred
.]
1.
The oath of allegiance taken by Roman soldiers; hence, a sacred ceremony used to impress an obligation; a solemn oath-taking; an oath.
[Obs.]
I’ll take the
sacrament
on't.
Shakespeare
2.
The pledge or token of an oath or solemn covenant; a sacred thing; a mystery.
[Obs.]
God sometimes sent a light of fire, and pillar of a cloud . . . and the
sacrament
of a rainbow, to guide his people through their portion of sorrows.
Jer. Taylor.
3.
(Theol.)
One of the solemn religious ordinances enjoined by Christ, the head of the Christian church, to be observed by his followers; hence, specifically, the eucharist; the Lord's Supper.
Syn.
Sacrament
,
Eucharist
.
Protestants apply the term sacrament to baptism and the Lord's Supper, especially the latter. The R. Cath. and Greek churches have five other sacraments, viz., confirmation, penance, holy orders, matrimony, and extreme unction. As sacrament denotes an oath or vow, the word has been applied by way of emphasis to the Lord's Supper, where the most sacred vows are renewed by the Christian in commemorating the death of his Redeemer. Eucharist denotes the giving of thanks; and this term also has been applied to the same ordinance, as expressing the grateful remembrance of Christ's sufferings and death. “Some receive the sacrament as a means to procure great graces and blessings; others as an eucharist and an office of thanksgiving for what they have received.”
Jer. Taylor.

Sac′ra-ment

,
Verb.
T.
To bind by an oath.
[Obs.]
Laud.

Webster 1828 Edition


Sacrament

SAC'RAMENT

,
Noun.
[L. sacramentum, an oath, from sacer, sacred.]
1.
Among ancient christian writers, a mystery. [Not in use.]
2.
An oath; a ceremony producing an obligation; but not used in this general sense.
3.
In present usage, an outward and visible sign of inward and spiritual grace; or more particularly, a solemn religious ceremony enjoined by Christ, the head of the christian church, to be observed by his followers, by which their special relation to him is created, or their obligations to him renewed and ratified. Thus baptism is called a sacrament, for by it persons are separated from the world, brought into Christ's visible church, and laid under particular obligations to obey his precepts. The eucharist or communion of the Lord's supper, is also a sacrament, for by commemorating the death and dying love of Christ, christians avow their special relation to him, and renew their obligations to be faithful to their divine Master. When we use sacrament without any qualifying word, we mean by it,
4.
The eucharist or Lord's supper.

SAC'RAMENT

,
Verb.
T.
To bind by an oath. [Not used.]

Definition 2022


sacrament

sacrament

English

Noun

sacrament (plural sacraments)

  1. (Christianity) A sacred act or ceremony in Christianity. In Catholic theology, a sacrament is defined as "an outward sign instituted by Christ to give grace."
  2. (in particular) The Eucharist.
  3. The consecrated Eucharist (especially the bread).
  4. A thing which is regarded as possessing a sacred character or mysterious significance.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      God sometimes sent a light of fire, and pillar of a cloud [] and the sacrament of a rainbow, to guide his people through their portion of sorrows.
  5. The oath of allegiance taken by soldiers in Ancient Rome; hence, any sacred ceremony used to impress an obligation; a solemn oath-taking; an oath.
    • Shakespeare
      I'll take the sacrament on 't.

Translations

See also


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: sa‧cra‧ment
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Etymology

From Old French sacrament, from Ecclesiastical Latin sacrāmentum (sacrament), from Latin sacrō (hallow, consecrate), from sacer (sacred, holy), originally sum deposited by parties to a suit.

Noun

sacrament n (plural sacramenten)

  1. (Christianity) sacrament