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Webster 1913 Edition


Parable

Par′a-ble

,
Adj.
[L.
parabilis
, fr.
parare
to provide.]
Procurable.
[Obs.]
Sir T. Browne.

Par′a-ble

,
Noun.
[F.
parabole
, L.
parabola
, fr. Gr. [GREEK] a placing beside or together, a comparing, comparison, a parable, fr. [GREEK] to throw beside, compare;
παρά
beside + [GREEK] to throw; cf. Skr.
gal
to drop. Cf.
Emblem
,
Gland
,
Palaver
,
Parabola
,
Parley
,
Parabole
,
Symbol
.]
A comparison; a similitude; specifically, a short fictitious narrative of something which might really occur in life or nature, by means of which a moral is drawn;
as, the
parables
of Christ
.
Chaucer.
Declare unto us the
parable
of the tares.
Matt. xiii. 36.
Syn. – See
Allegory
, and Note under
Apologue
.

Par′a-ble

,
Verb.
T.
To represent by parable.
[R.]
Which by the ancient sages was thus parabled.
Milton.

Webster 1828 Edition


Parable

PAR'ABLE

,
Noun.
[L. parabilis.] Easily procured. [Not used.]

PAR'ABLE

,
Noun.
[L. parabola; Gr. to throw forward or against, to compare to or against; as in confero, collatum, to set together, or one thing with another.] A fable or allegorical relation or representation of something real in life or nature, from which a moral is drawn for instruction; such as the parable of the trees choosing a king, Judges 9.; the parable of the poor man and his lamb. 2 Sam. 12.; the parable of the ten virgins, Matt.25.

PAR'ABLE

,
Verb.
T.
To represent by fiction or fable.

Definition 2022


parable

parable

English

Noun

parable (plural parables)

  1. A short narrative illustrating a lesson (usually religious/moral) by comparison or analogy
    In the New Testament the parables told by Jesus convey His message, as in "The parable of the prodigal son"
    Catholic sermons normally draw on at least one Biblical lecture, often parables.
Related terms
Translations

See also

Verb

parable (third-person singular simple present parables, present participle parabling, simple past and past participle parabled)

  1. (transitive) To represent by parable.
    Which by the ancient sages was thus parabled. Milton.

Etymology 2

From Latin parābilis, from parāre (to prepare, procure).

Adjective

parable (comparative more parable, superlative most parable)

  1. (obsolete) That can easily be prepared or procured; obtainable.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, vol.1, New York Review of Books, 2001, p.306:
      The most parable and easy, and about which many are employed, is to teach a school, turn lecturer or curate [...].
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Thomas Browne to this entry?)

Anagrams


French

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin parare (to ward off)

Adjective

parable m, f (plural parables)

  1. preventable (able to be or fit to be prevented)

Related terms

Anagrams