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Webster 1913 Edition


Eath

Eath

(ēth)
,
Adj.
&
adv.
[AS.
eáðe
.]
Easy or easily.
[Obs.]
Eath to move with plaints.”
Fairfax.

Webster 1828 Edition


Eath

EATH

,
Adj.
easy, and adv. easily.

Definition 2022


eath

eath

See also: eaþ

English

Alternative forms

  • eith, eeth, aith (Scotland)

Adjective

eath (comparative eather, superlative eathest)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Easy; not hard or difficult.
    • 1600, Edward Fairfax, The Jerusalem Delivered of Tasso, XIX, lxi:
      There, as he look'd, he saw the canvas rent, / Through which the voice found eath and open way.
    • 1609, Thomas Heywood, Troia Britanica, or Great Britain's Troy:
      At these advantages he knowes 'tis eath to cope with her quite severed from her maids.
    • 1847, Hugh Miller, First Impressions of England and its people:
      There has been much written on the learning of Shakespeare but not much to the purpose: one of our old Scotch proverbs is worth all the dissertations on the subject I have yet seen. "God's bairns", it says, "are eath to lear", [].

Antonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Adverb

eath

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Easily.
    • 1823, J. Kennedy, Poems:
      Their food and their raiment he eith can supply.

Anagrams