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Webster 1913 Edition


Determinate

De-ter′mi-nate

,
Adj.
[L.
determinatus
, p. p. of
determinare
. See
Determine
.]
1.
Having defined limits; not uncertain or arbitrary; fixed; established; definite.
Quantity of words and a
determinate
number of feet.
Dryden.
2.
Conclusive; decisive; positive.
The
determinate
counsel and foreknowledge of God.
Acts ii. 23.
3.
Determined or resolved upon.
[Obs.]
My
determinate
voyage.
Shakespeare
4.
Of determined purpose; resolute.
[Obs.]
More
determinate
to do than skillful how to do.
Sir P. Sidney.
Determinate inflorescence
(Bot.)
,
that in which the flowering commences with the terminal bud of a stem, which puts a limit to its growth; – also called
centrifugal inflorescence
.
Determinate problem
(Math.)
,
a problem which admits of a limited number of solutions.
Determinate quantities
,
Determinate equations
(Math.)
,
those that are finite in the number of values or solutions, that is, in which the conditions of the problem or equation determine the number.

De-ter′mi-nate

,
Verb.
T.
To bring to an end; to determine. See
Determine
.
[Obs.]
The sly, slow hours shall not
determinate

The dateless limit of thy dear exile.
Shakespeare

Webster 1828 Edition


Determinate

DETERMINATE

,
Adj.
[L.]
1.
Limited; fixed; definite; as a determinate quantity of matter.
2.
Established; settled; positive; as a determinate rule or order.
The determinate counsel of God. Acts 2.
3.
Decisive; conclusive; as a determinate resolution or judgment.
4.
Resolved on.
5.
Fixed; resolute.

DETERMINATE

,
Verb.
T.
To limit. [Not used. See Determine.]

Definition 2022


determinate

determinate

English

Adjective

determinate (not comparable)

  1. Distinct, clearly defined. [from 14th c.]
    • Dryden
      Quantity of words and a determinate number of feet.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, Chapter VIII, p. 122,
      [] on account of his responsibility to Norman and Marigold, and on account of his now determinate age, he considered himself ineligible for more dangerous service.
  2. Fixed, set, unvarying. [from 16th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts II:
      hym have ye taken by the hondes of unrightewes persones, after he was delivered by the determinat counsell and foreknowledge of God, and have crucified and slayne hym [...].
  3. (biology) Of growth: ending once a genetically predetermined structure has formed.
  4. Conclusive; decisive; positive.
    • Bible, Acts ii. 23
      The determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God.
  5. (obsolete) Determined or resolved upon.
    • Shakespeare
      My determinate voyage.
  6. Of determined purpose; resolute.
    • Sir Philip Sidney
      More determinate to do than skillful how to do.

Antonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

determinate (plural determinates)

  1. (philosophy) A single state of a particular determinable attribute.
    • 2007 September 5, David Denby, “Generating possibilities”, in Philosophical Studies, volume 141, number 2, DOI:10.1007/s11098-007-9159-z:
      And since being negatively-charged and being positively-charged are determinates of the same determinable, [D5] will not permit us to infer worlds where anything negatively-charged is also positively-charged.

Verb

determinate (third-person singular simple present determinates, present participle determinating, simple past and past participle determinated)

  1. (obsolete) To bring to an end; to determine.
    • Shakespeare
      The sly, slow hours shall not determinate / The dateless limit of thy dear exile.

Esperanto

Adverb

determinate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of determini

Italian

Adjective

determinate f pl

  1. feminine plural of determinato

Anagrams


Latin

Verb

dētermināte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of dēterminō