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Webster 1913 Edition


Aim

Aim

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Aimed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Aiming
.]
[OE.
amen
,
aimen
,
eimen
, to guess at, to estimate, to aim, OF.
esmer
,
asmer
, fr. L.
aestimare
to estimate; or perh. fr. OF.
aesmer
; [GREEK] (L.
ad
) +
esmer
. See
Estimate
.]
1.
To point or direct a missile weapon, or a weapon which propels as missile, towards an object or spot with the intent of hitting it;
as, to
aim
at a fox, or at a target
.
2.
To direct the indention or purpose; to attempt the accomplishment of a purpose; to try to gain; to endeavor; – followed by at, or by an infinitive;
as, to
aim
at distinction; to
aim
to do well.
Aim’st
thou at princes?
Pope.
3.
To guess or conjecture.
[Obs.]
Shak.

Aim

,
Verb.
T.
To direct or point, as a weapon, at a particular object; to direct, as a missile, an act, or a proceeding, at, to, or against an object;
as, to
aim
a musket or an arrow, the fist or a blow (
at
something); to
aim
a satire or a reflection (
at
some person or vice).

Aim

,
Noun.
[Cf. OF.
esme
estimation, fr.
esmer
. See
Aim
,
Verb.
I.
]
1.
The pointing of a weapon, as a gun, a dart, or an arrow, in the line of direction with the object intended to be struck; the line of fire; the direction of anything, as a spear, a blow, a discourse, a remark, towards a particular point or object, with a view to strike or affect it.
Each at the head leveled his deadly
aim
.
Milton.
2.
The point intended to be hit, or object intended to be attained or affected.
To be the
aim
of every dangerous shot.
Shakespeare
3.
Intention; purpose; design; scheme.
How oft ambitious
aims
are crossed!
Pope.
4.
Conjecture; guess.
[Obs.]
What you would work me to, I have some
aim
.
Shakespeare
To cry aim
(Archery)
,
to encourage.
[Obs.]
Shak.
Syn. – End; object; scope; drift; design; purpose; intention; scheme; tendency; aspiration.

Webster 1828 Edition


Aim

AIM

, v.i.
To point at, with a missive weapon; to direct the intention or purpose; to attempt to reach, or accomplish; to tend towards; to endeavor; followed by at before the object; as, a man aims at distinction; or aims to be rich.

AIM

,
Verb.
T.
To direct or point as a weapon; to direct to a particular object; as, to aim a musket or an arrow, the first or a blow; to aim a satire or a reflection at some person or vice.

AIM

,
Noun.
1.
The pointing or direction of a missile weapon; the direction of any thing to a particular point or object, with a view to strike or affect it; as a spear, a blow, a discourse or remark.
2.
The point intended to be hit, or object intended to be affected; as, a man missed his aim.
3.
Figuratively, a purpose; intention; design; scheme; as, men are often disappointed of their aim.
4.
Conjecture; guess.
It is impossible, by aim, to tell it. [Not used.]

Definition 2022


aim

aim

See also: AIM and -aim

English

Noun

aim (plural aims)

  1. The pointing of a weapon, as a gun, a dart, or an arrow, or object, in the line of direction with the object intended to be struck; the line of fire; the direction of anything, as a spear, a blow, a discourse, a remark, towards a particular point or object, with a view to strike or affect it.
  2. The point intended to be hit, or object intended to be attained or affected.
  3. Intention; purpose; design; scheme.
    My number one aim in life is to make money to make my parents, siblings and kids happy.
  4. (obsolete) Conjecture; guess.
    • Shakespeare
      What you would work me to, I have some aim.
Synonyms
Translations

Verb

aim (third-person singular simple present aims, present participle aiming, simple past and past participle aimed)

  1. (intransitive) To point or direct a missile weapon, or a weapon which propels as missile, towards an object or spot with the intent of hitting it; as, to aim at a fox, or at a target.
  2. (intransitive) To direct the intention or purpose; to attempt the accomplishment of a purpose; to try to gain; to endeavor;followed by at, or by an infinitive; as, to aim at distinction; to aim to do well.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, in The Celebrity:
      The stories did not seem to me to touch life. They were plainly intended to have a bracing moral effect, and perhaps had this result for the people at whom they were aimed.
    • 2013 June 22, Snakes and ladders”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 76:
      Risk is everywhere. [] For each one there is a frighteningly precise measurement of just how likely it is to jump from the shadows and get you. “The Norm Chronicles” [] aims to help data-phobes find their way through this blizzard of risks.
  3. (transitive) To direct or point, as a weapon, at a particular object; to direct, as a missile, an act, or a proceeding, at, to, or against an object; as, to aim a musket or an arrow, the fist or a blow (at something); to aim a satire or a reflection (at some person or vice).
  4. (obsolete) To guess or conjecture.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
Usage notes
  • Sense 2. This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. See Appendix:English catenative verbs
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

aim

  1. Initialism of America Online. AIM; AOL Instant Messenger.

Anagrams


Estonian

Etymology

Of Finnic origin. Cognate to Finnish aimottaa.

Noun

aim (genitive aimu, partitive aimu)

  1. sense, idea of something, feeling
    Pole aimugi.
    I have no idea.

Declension