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Webster 1913 Edition


Agree

{

A-gre′

,

A-gree′

}
,
adv.
[F.
à gré
. See
Agree
.]
In good part; kindly.
[Obs.]
Rom. of R.

A-gree′

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Agreed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Agreeing
.]
[F.
agréer
to accept or receive kindly, fr.
à gré
;
(L.
ad
) +
gré
good will, consent, liking, fr. L.
gratus
pleasing, agreeable. See
Grateful
.]
1.
To harmonize in opinion, statement, or action; to be in unison or concord; to be or become united or consistent; to concur;
as, all parties
agree
in the expediency of the law
.
If music and sweet poetry
agree
.
Shakespeare
Their witness
agreed
not together.
Mark xiv. 56.
The more you
agree
together, the less hurt can your enemies do you.
Sir T. Browne.
2.
To yield assent; to accede; – followed by to;
as, to
agree
to an offer, or to opinion
.
3.
To make a stipulation by way of settling differences or determining a price; to exchange promises; to come to terms or to a common resolve; to promise.
Agree
with thine adversary quickly.
Matt. v. 25.
Didst not thou
agree
with me for a penny ?
Matt. xx. 13.
4.
To be conformable; to resemble; to coincide; to correspond;
as, the picture does not
agree
with the original; the two scales
agree
exactly.
5.
To suit or be adapted in its effects; to do well;
as, the same food does not
agree
with every constitution
.
6.
(Gram.)
To correspond in gender, number, case, or person.
☞ The auxiliary forms of to be are often employed with the participle agreed. “The jury were agreed.”
Macaulay.
“Can two walk together, except they be agreed ?”
Amos iii. 3.
The principal intransitive uses were probably derived from the transitive verb used reflexively. “I agree me well to your desire.”
Ld. Berners.
Syn. – To assent; concur; consent; acquiesce; accede; engage; promise; stipulate; contract; bargain; correspond; harmonize; fit; tally; coincide; comport.

A-gree′

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To make harmonious; to reconcile or make friends.
[Obs.]
Spenser.
2.
To admit, or come to one mind concerning; to settle; to arrange;
as, to
agree
the fact; to
agree
differences.
[Obs.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Agree

AGREE'

, v.i.[L. gratia. the primary sense is advancing, from the same root as L. gradior.]
1.
To be of one mind; to harmonize in opinion.
In the expediency of the law, all the parties agree.
2.
To live in concord, or without contention; as, parents and children agree well together.
3.
To yield assent; to approve or admit; followed by to; as, to agree to an offer, or to an opinion.
4.
To settle by stipulation, the minds of parties being agreed, as to the terms; as,
Didst thou not agree with me for a penny a day? Mat. 20
To agree on articles of partnership
5.
To come to a compromise of differences; to be reconciled.
Agree with thy adversary quickly. Mat. 5
6.
To come to one opinion or mind; to concur; as, to agree on a place of meeting.
This sense differs not essentially from the fourth, and it often implies a resolving to do an act. John 9.
7.
To be consistent; to harmonize; not to contradict, or be repugnant.
Their witness agreed not together. Mark 24.
This story agrees with what has been related by others.
8.
To resemble; to be similar; as, the picture does not agree with the original.
9.
To suit; to be accommodated or adapted to; as, the same food does not agree with every constitution.

AGREE'

,
Verb.
T.
To admit, or come to one mind concerning; as, to agree the fact. Also, to reconcile or make friends; to put an end to variance; but these senses are unusual and hardly legitimate. Let the parties agree the fact, is really elliptical; let them agree on the fact.

Definition 2021


agree

agree

See also: agrée and agréé

English

Verb

agree (third-person singular simple present agrees, present participle agreeing, simple past and past participle agreed)

  1. (intransitive) To harmonize in opinion, statement, or action; to be in unison or concord; to be or become united or consistent; to concur.
    all parties agree in the expediency of the law.
    • 1594, Thomas Lodge, The wounds of civil war: Lively set forth in the true tragedies of Marius and Scilla, page 46:
      You know that in so great a state as this, Two mightie foes can never well agree.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      If music and sweet poetry agree.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Mark xiv. 56.
      Their witness agreed not together.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Sir Thomas Browne
      The more you agree together, the less hurt can your enemies do you.
  2. (intransitive) To yield assent; to accede;followed by to.
    to agree to an offer, or to opinion.
  3. (transitive, Britain, Ireland) To yield assent to; to approve.
    • 1666, Samuel Pepys, The Diary of Samuel Pepys, page 88:
      ... and there, after a good while in discourse, we did agree a bargain of £5,000 with Sir Roger Cuttance for my Lord Sandwich for silk, cinnamon, ...
    • 2005, Paddy McNutt, Law, economics and antitrust: towards a new perspective, page 59:
      The essential idea is that parties should enter the market, choose their contractors, set their own terms and agree a bargain.
    • 2011 April 3, John Burke, in The Sunday Business Post:
      Bishops agree sex abuse rules
  4. (intransitive) To make a stipulation by way of settling differences or determining a price; to exchange promises; to come to terms or to a common resolve; to promise.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Matt. v. 25.
      Agree with thine adversary quickly.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Matt. xx. 13.
      Didst not thou agree with me for a penny ?
  5. (intransitive) To be conformable; to resemble; to coincide; to correspond.
    the picture does not agree with the original; the two scales agree exactly.
  6. (intransitive, now always with with) To suit or be adapted in its effects; to do well.
    the same food does not agree with every constitution.
  7. (intransitive, grammar) To correspond to in gender, number, case, or person.
  8. (intransitive, law) To consent to a contract or to an element of a contract.

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. See Appendix:English catenative verbs
  • The transitive usage could be considered as just an omission of to or upon.
  • US and Canadian English do not use the transitive form. Thus "they agreed on a price" or "they agreed to the conditions" are used in North America but not "they agreed a price" or "they agreed the conditions".

Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations

External links

  • agree in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • agree in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: result · formed · fight · #764: agree · sit · considerable · private

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