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Webster 1828 Edition


Plow

PLOW

, n.
1.
In agriculture, an instrument for turning up, breaking and preparing the ground for receiving the seed. It is drawn by oxen or horses and saves the labor of digging; it is therefore the most useful instrument in agriculture.
The emperor lays hold of the plow and turns up several furrows.
When fern succeeds, ungrateful to the plow.
2.
Figuratively, tillage; culture of the earth; agriculture.
3.
A joiner's instrument for grooving.

PLOW

,
Verb.
T.
To trench and turn up with a plow; as, to plow the ground for wheat; to plow it into ridges.
1.
To furrow; to divide; to run through in sailing.
With speed we plow the watery wave.
2.
To tear; to furrow.
3.
In Scripture, to labor in any calling.
He that ploweth should plow in hope. 1 Cor.9.
To plow on the back, to scourge; to mangle, or to persecute and torment. Ps.129.
To plow with one's heifer, to deal with the wife to obtain something from the husband. Judges 14.
To plow iniquity or wickedness, and reap it, to devise and practice it, and at last suffer the punishment of it. Job.14. Hos.10.
To plow in, to cover by plowing; as, to plow in wheat.
To plow up or out, to turn out of the ground by plowing.
To put one's hand to the plow and look back, is to enter on the service of Christ and afterwards abandon it. Luke 9.
[This difference of orthography often made between the noun and verb is wholly unwarrantable, and contrary to settled analogy in our language. Such a difference is never made in changing into verbs, plot, harrow, notice, question, and most other words. See Practice.]

Definition 2022


plow

plow

English

Noun

plow (plural plows)

  1. (US) Alternative spelling of plough

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

plow (third-person singular simple present plows, present participle plowing, simple past and past participle plowed)

  1. (US) Alternative spelling of plough
    • 2013 June 18, Simon Romero, "Protests Widen as Brazilians Chide Leaders," New York Times (retrieved 21 June 2013):
      Government institutions seem prepared to continue plowing public funds into the projects. A Brazilian newspaper reported Tuesday that the national development bank had approved a new loan of about $200 million for Itaquerão, a new stadium in São Paulo that is expected to host the opening match of the World Cup.

Translations