Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Divine

Di-vine′

,
Adj.
[Compar.
Diviner
;
superl
.
Divinest
.]
[F.
divin
, L.
divinus
divine, divinely inspired, fr.
divus
,
dius
, belonging to a deity; akin to Gr. [GREEK], and L.
deus
, God. See
Deity
.]
1.
Of or belonging to God;
as,
divine
perfections; the
divine
will.
“The immensity of the divine nature.”
Paley.
2.
Proceeding from God;
as,
divine
judgments
.
Divine protection.”
Bacon.
3.
Appropriated to God, or celebrating his praise; religious; pious; holy;
as,
divine
service;
divine
songs;
divine
worship.
4.
Pertaining to, or proceeding from, a deity; partaking of the nature of a god or the gods.
“The divine Apollo said.”
Shak.
5.
Godlike; heavenly; excellent in the highest degree; supremely admirable; apparently above what is human. In this application, the word admits of comparison;
as, the
divinest
mind
.
Sir J. Davies.
“The divine Desdemona.”
Shak.
A
divine
sentence is in the lips of the king.
Prov. xvi. 10.
But not to one in this benighted age
Is that
diviner
inspiration given.
Gray.
6.
Presageful; foreboding; prescient.
[Obs.]
Yet oft his heart,
divine
of something ill,
Misgave him.
Milton.
7.
Relating to divinity or theology.
Syn. – Supernatural; superhuman; godlike; heavenly; celestial; pious; holy; sacred; preëminent.

Di-vine′

,
Noun.
[L.
divinus
a soothsayer, LL., a theologian. See
Divine
,
Adj.
]
1.
One skilled in divinity; a theologian.
“Poets were the first divines.”
Denham.
2.
A minister of the gospel; a priest; a clergyman.
The first
divines
of New England were surpassed by none in extensive erudition.
J. Woodbridge.

Di-vine′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Divined
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Divining
.]
[L.
divinare
: cf. F.
deviner
. See
Divination
.]
1.
To foresee or foreknow; to detect; to anticipate; to conjecture.
A sagacity which
divined
the evil designs.
Bancroft.
2.
To foretell; to predict; to presage.
Darest thou . . .
divine
his downfall?
Shakespeare
3.
To render divine; to deify.
[Obs.]
Syn. – To foretell; predict; presage; prophesy; prognosticate; forebode; guess; conjecture; surmise.

Di-vine′

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To use or practice divination; to foretell by divination; to utter prognostications.
The prophets thereof
divine
for money.
Micah iii. 11.
2.
To have or feel a presage or foreboding.
Suggest but truth to my
divining
thoughts.
Shakespeare
3.
To conjecture or guess;
as, to
divine
rightly
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Divine

DIVINE

,
Adj.
[L., a god.]
1.
Pertaining to the true God; as the divine nature; divine perfections.
2.
Pertaining to a heathen deity, or to false gods.
3.
Partaking of the nature of God.
Half human, half divine.
4.
Proceeding from God; as divine judgments.
5.
Godlike; heavenly; excellent in the highest degree; extraordinary; apparently above what is human. In this application the word admits of comparison; as a divine invention; a divine genius; the divinest mind.
A divine sentence is in the lips of the king. Proverbs 16.
6.
Presageful; foreboding; prescient. [Not used.]
7.
Appropriated to God, or celebrating his praise; as divine service; divine songs; divine worship.

DIVINE

,
Noun.
1.
A minister of the gospel; a priest; a clergyman.
The first divines of New England were surpassed by none in extensive erudition, personal sanctity, and diligence in the pastoral office.
2.
A man skilled in divinity; a theologian; as a great divine.

DIVINE

,
Verb.
T.
[L.]
1.
To foreknow; to foretell; to presage.
Darst thou divine his downfall?
2.
To deify. [Not in use.]

DIVINE

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To use or practice divination.
2.
To utter presages or prognostications.
The prophets thereof divine for money. Micah 3.
3.
To have presages or forebodings.
Suggest but truth to my divining thoughts--
4.
To guess or conjecture.
Could you divine what lovers bear.

Definition 2022


divine

divine

See also: diviné

English

Adjective

divine (comparative more divine, superlative most divine)

  1. Of or pertaining to a god.
  2. Eternal, holy, or otherwise godlike.
  3. Of superhuman or surpassing excellence.
  4. Beautiful, heavenly.
  5. (obsolete) Foreboding; prescient.
    • Milton
      Yet oft his heart, divine of something ill, / Misgave him.
  6. Relating to divinity or theology.
    • South
      church history and other divine learning
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

divine (plural divines)

  1. One skilled in divinity; a theologian.
    • Denham
      Poets were the first divines.
  2. A minister of the gospel; a priest; a clergyman.
    • J. Woodbridge
      The first divines of New England were surpassed by none in extensive erudition.
  3. (often capitalized, with 'the') God or a god, particularly in its aspect as a transcendental concept.
Synonyms
Derived terms
  • archdivine
  • school-divine
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle French deviner, from Latin divino.

Verb

divine (third-person singular simple present divines, present participle divining, simple past and past participle divined)

  1. (transitive) To foretell (something), especially by the use of divination.
    • Bancroft
      a sagacity which divined the evil designs
    • Shakespeare
      Darest thou [] divine his downfall?
  2. (transitive) To guess (something).
  3. (transitive) To search for (underground objects or water) using a divining rod.
  4. To render divine; to deify.
    • Spenser
      Living on earth like angel new divined.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
Related terms

Anagrams


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /di.vin/

Adjective

divine

  1. feminine singular of divin

Italian

Adjective

divine

  1. feminine plural of divino

Latin

Etymology

From dīvīnus (of divine origin)

Adverb

dīvīnē (comparable dīvīnius, superlative dīvīnissimē)

  1. prophetically, by divine inspiration
  2. divinely, admirably

Synonyms

Related terms

References


Spanish

Verb

divine

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of divinar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of divinar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of divinar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of divinar.