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Webster 1913 Edition


Crock

Crock

(krŏk)
,
Noun.
[Cf. W.
croeg
cover, Scot.
crochit
covered.]
The loose black particles collected from combustion, as on pots and kettles, or in a chimney; soot; smut; also, coloring matter which rubs off from cloth.

Crock

,
Noun.
A low stool.
“I . . . seated her upon a little crock.”
Tatler.

Crock

(krŏk)
,
Noun.
[AS.
croc
,
croca
,
crog
,
croh
; akin to D.
kruik
, G.
krug
, Icel.
krukka
, Dan.
krukke
, Sw.
kruka
; but cf. W.
crwc
bucket, pail,
crochan
pot,
cregen
earthen vessel, jar. Cf.
Cruet
.]
Any piece of crockery, especially of coarse earthenware; an earthen pot or pitcher.
Like foolish flies about an honey
crock
.
Spenser.

Crock

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Crocked
(krŏkt)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Crocking
.]
To soil by contact, as with soot, or with the coloring matter of badly dyed cloth.

Crock

,
Verb.
I.
To give off crock or smut.

Crock

,
Verb.
T.
To lay up in a crock;
as, to
crock
butter
.
Halliwell.

Webster 1828 Edition


Crock

CROCK

,
Noun.
An earthen vessel; a pot or pitcher; a cup.

CROCK

,
Noun.
Soot, or the black matter collected from combustion on pots and kettles, or in a chimney.

CROCK

,
Verb.
T.
or I. To black with soot, or other matter collected from combustion; or to black with the coloring matter of cloth.

Definition 2022


crock

crock

English

Noun

crock (plural crocks)

  1. A stoneware or earthenware jar or storage container.
    • 1590-96, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, 1750, The Works of Spenser, Volume 3, page 181,
      Therefore the Vulgar did about him flock / And cluster thick unto his leaſings vain; / Like fooliſh Flies about an Honey-Crock; / In hope by him great Benefit to gain, / And uncontrolled Freedom to obtain.
  2. A piece of broken pottery, a shard.
  3. (Britain) A person who is physically limited by age, illness or injury.
    Old crocks’ home = home for the aged
    • 1925, John Buchan, John Macnab, Gutenberg Australia eBook #0300621,
      He was getting very proud of the way he had learned to manage his game leg, and it occurred to him that here was a chance of testing his balance. [] “Not so bad that, for a crock,” he told himself, as he lay full length in the sun watching the faint line of the Haripol hills overtopping the ridge of Crask.
    • 1932, Helen Simpson, Boomerang, Gutenberg Australia eBook #0800611,
      He was in love with a girl, whose full name he did not tell me, and whom he had not seen for two years. She was a Lady Diana Someone, so much I knew, very lovely, a sort of relation, and he believed he had a chance if only the doctors could do something to help his asthma. “Can′t ask a girl to marry a crock.”
    • 2006 The Moving Finger part one, Miss Marple, 15 min, 20 year old bicycling tomboy to injured walker:
      Girl: "Will you always be a bit of a crock?"
      Man: "According to my doctor, no."
      Girl: "I was afraid you looked bad-tempered because you were crocked up for life."
  4. (Britain) An old or broken-down vehicle (and formerly a horse).
    Old crocks race = veteran car rally
  5. (slang, countable and uncountable) Silly talk, a foolish belief, a poor excuse, nonsense.
    That is a bunch of crock.
    The story is a crock.
  6. A low stool.
    • 1709, Isaac Bickerstaff (Richard Steele), The Tatler, 1822, Alexander Chalmers (editor), The Tatler, 2007 Facsimile Edition, page 12,
      I then inquired for the person that belonged to the petticoat; and, to my great surprise, was directed to a very beautiful young damsel, with so pretty a face and shape, that I bid her come out of the crowd, and seated her upon a little crock at my left hand.
Synonyms
Translations

Verb

crock (third-person singular simple present crocks, present participle crocking, simple past and past participle crocked)

  1. To break something or injure someone.
    • 1904, P.G. Wodehouse, The Gold Bat :
      "That last time I brought down Barry I crocked him. He's in his study now with a sprained ankle. ..."
    • 2007 January 3, Daily Mirror:
    Thousands of cars crocked by dodgy fuel
    • 2006 April 30, The Sunday Times:
    Ferreira ... peremptorily expunges England’s World Cup chances by crocking Wayne Rooney.
  2. (textiles, leatherworking) To transfer coloring through abrasion from one item to another.
    • 1917, John H. Pfingsten, "Colouring-matter for leather and method of using the same" , US Patent 1371572, page 1:
      thus producing a permanent, definite color thereon which will not fade or crock, and at the same time using up all of the coloring matter.
    • 1964, Isabel Barnum Wingate, Know Your Merchandise , page 109:
    Colored fabrics should be dried separately for the first few times to prevent crocking (rubbing off of dye).
    • 2002, Sandy Scrivano, Sewing With Leather & Suede , ISBN 1579902731, page 95:
    In leather garments, lining also prevents crocking of color onto skin or garments worn underneath.
  3. (horticulture) To cover the drain holes of a planter with stones or similar material, in order to ensure proper drainage.
    • 1900, H.A. Burberry, The Amateur Orchid Cultivators' Guide Book , page 21:
      The pots should be crocked for drainage to one-half their depth and the plants made moderately firm in the compost, as already indicated...
  4. (transitive, now dialectal) To put or store (something) in a crock or pot.
    • 1970, Donald Harington, Lightning Bug:
      She filled the pail and carried it down to the springhouse to crock it and leave it to cool.
Translations

Derived terms

References

  • Krueger, Dennis (December 1982). "Why On Earth Do They Call It Throwing?" Studio Potter Vol. 11, Number 1. (etymology)

Etymology 2

Compare Welsh croeg (cover), Scots crochit (covered).

Noun

crock (uncountable)

  1. The loose black particles collected from combustion, as on pots and kettles, or in a chimney; soot; smut.
  2. Colouring matter that rubs off from cloth.

Verb

crock (third-person singular simple present crocks, present participle crocking, simple past and past participle crocked)

  1. (intransitive) To give off crock or smut.