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Webster 1913 Edition


Confer

Con-fer′

(kŏn-fẽr′)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Conferred
(#)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Conferring
.]
[L.
conferre
to bring together, contribute, consult;
con-
+
ferre
to bear: cf. F.
conférer
. See 1st
Bear
.]
1.
To bring together for comparison; to compare.
[Obs.]
If we
confer
these observations with others of the like nature, we may find cause to rectify the general opinion.
Boyle.
2.
To grant as a possession; to bestow.
The public marks of honor and reward
Conferred
upon me.
Milton.
3.
To contribute; to conduce.
[Obs.]
The closeness and compactness of the parts resting together doth much
confer
to the strength of the union.
Glanvill.

Con-fer′

,
Verb.
I.
To have discourse; to consult; to compare views; to deliberate.
Festus, when he had
conferred
with the council, answered.
Acts xxv. 12.
Syn. – To counsel; advise; discourse; converse.

Webster 1828 Edition


Confer

CONFER'

,
Verb.
I.
[L., to bear, to bring forth, to show, to declare. See Bear.] To discourse; to converse; to consult together; implying conversation on some serious or important subject, in distinction from mere talk or light familiar conversation; followed by with.
Adonijah conferred with Joab and Abiathar. I Kings 1.
Festus conferred with the council. Acts 25.

CONFER'

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To give, or bestow; followed by on.
Coronation confers on the king no royal authority.
This word is particularly used to express the grant of favors, benefits and privileges to be enjoyed, or rights which are to be permanent; as, to confer on one the privileges of a citizen; to confer a title or an honor.
2.
To compare; to examine by comparison; literally, to bring together. [See Compare.]
If we confer these observations with others of the like nature.
[This sense, though genuine, is now obsolete.]
3.
To contribute; to conduce to; that is, to bring to. The closeness of parts confers much to the strength of the union, or intransitively, confers to the strength of the union.

Definition 2021


confer

confer

English

Verb

confer (third-person singular simple present confers, present participle conferring, simple past and past participle conferred)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To compare. [16th–18th c.]
    • 1557 (book title):
      The Newe Testament ... Conferred diligently with the Greke, and best approued translations.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, II.3.1.i:
      Confer thine estate with others []. Be content and rest satisfied, for thou art well in respect to others [].
    • Boyle
      If we confer these observations with others of the like nature, we may find cause to rectify the general opinion.
  2. (intransitive) To talk together, to consult, discuss; to deliberate. [from 16th c.]
    • 1974, "A Traveler's Perils", Time, 25 Mar 1974:
      Local buttons popped when Henry Kissinger visited Little Rock last month to confer with Fulbright on the Middle East oil talks.
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To bring together; to collect, gather. [16th–17th c.]
  4. (transitive) To grant as a possession; to bestow. [from 16th c.]
    • Milton
      the public marks of honour and reward conferred upon me
    • 2010, Andrew Rawnsley, The Observer, 7 Feb 2010:
      The special immunities that are conferred on MPs were framed with the essential purpose of allowing them to speak freely in parliament.
  5. (obsolete, intransitive) To contribute; to conduce. [16th–18th c.]
    • Glanvill
      The closeness and compactness of the parts resting together doth much confer to the strength of the union.

Related terms

Translations

See also


Latin

Verb

cōnfer

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of cōnferō