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Webster 1913 Edition


Appoint

Ap-point′

(ăp-point′)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Appointed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Appointing
.]
[OE.
appointen
,
apointen
, OF.
apointier
to prepare, arrange, lean, place, F.
appointer
to give a salary, refer a cause, fr. LL.
appunctare
to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement; L.
ad
+
punctum
a point. See
Point
.]
1.
To fix with power or firmness; to establish; to mark out.
When he
appointed
the foundations of the earth.
Prov. viii. 29.
2.
To fix by a decree, order, command, resolve, decision, or mutual agreement; to constitute; to ordain; to prescribe; to fix the time and place of.
Thy servants are ready to do whatsoever my lord the king shall
appoint
.
2 Sam. xv. 15.
He hath
appointed
a day, in the which he will judge the world in righteousness.
Acts xvii. 31.
Say that the emperor request a parley . . . and
appoint
the meeting.
Shakespeare
3.
To assign, designate, or set apart by authority.
Aaron and his shall go in, and
appoint
them every one to his service.
Num. iv. 19.
These were cities
appointed
for all the children of Israel, and for the stranger that sojourneth among them.
Josh. xx. 9.
4.
To furnish in all points; to provide with everything necessary by way of equipment; to equip; to fit out.
The English, being well
appointed
, did so entertain them that their ships departed terribly torn.
Hayward.
5.
To point at by way, or for the purpose, of censure or commendation; to arraign.
[Obs.]
Appoint
not heavenly disposition.
Milton.
6.
(Law)
To direct, designate, or limit; to make or direct a new disposition of, by virtue of a power contained in a conveyance; – said of an estate already conveyed.
Burrill. Kent.
To appoint one’s self
,
to resolve.
[Obs.]
Crowley.

Ap-point′

(ăp-point′)
,
Verb.
I.
To ordain; to determine; to arrange.
For the Lord had
appointed
to defeat the good counsel of Ahithophel.
2 Sam. xvii. 14.

Webster 1828 Edition


Appoint

APPOINT'

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To fix; to settle; to establish; to make fast.
When he appointed the foundations of the earth. Prov. 8.
2.
To constitute, ordain, or fix by decree, order or decision.
Let Pharoah appoint officers over the land. Gen. 41.
He hath appointed a day in which he will judge the world. Act. 17.
3.
To allot, assign or designate.
Aaron and his sons shall appoint every one to his service. Num 4.
These cities were appointed for all the children of Israel. Josh. 20.
4.
To purpose or resolve; to fix the intention.
For so he had appointed. Acts 20.
5.
To ordain, command or order.
Thy servants are ready to do whatever my Lord the King shall appoint. 2Sam. 15.
6.
To settle; to fix, name or determine by agreement; as, they appointed a time and place for the meeting.

Definition 2022


appoint

appoint

English

Verb

appoint (third-person singular simple present appoints, present participle appointing, simple past and past participle appointed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To fix with power or firmness; to establish; to mark out.
    When he gave to the sea his decree, that the waters should not pass his commandment: when he appointed the foundations of the earth:
  2. (transitive) To fix the time and place of a meeting (by a decree, order, command etc.)
    • 8 November 2014, Ivan Hewett in The Telegraph, Art on demand makes emperors of us all
      We have to wait until they're ready to receive us, and make sure we turn up at the appointed time.
    • 1820, The Edinburgh Annual Register
      His Royal Highness called to pay his respects to her Majesty ; but, from the unexpected nature of his visit, her Majesty was not in a state then to receive him ; but soon after sent a letter to Prince Leopold, to appoint one o'clock this day for an interview.
    • 1611, King James Version 2 Samuel 15.15
      Thy servants are ready to do whatsoever my lord the king shall appoint.
  3. (transitive) To give a job or a role to somebody
  4. (transitive) To furnish completely; to provide with all the equipment necessary; to equip or fit out.
    • 2009, Donald Olson, Germany for Dummies
      The hotel is beautifully designed and beautifully appointed in a classic, modern style that manages to be both serene and luxurious at the same time.
  5. (archaic, transitive, law) To direct, designate, or limit; to make or direct a new disposition of, by virtue of a power contained in a conveyance;said of an estate already conveyed.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Alexander Mansfield Burrill to this entry?)
  6. To point at by way of censure or commendation; to arraign.
    • Milton
      Appoint not heavenly disposition.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations


French

Noun

appoint m (plural appoints)

  1. An amount of small change